Increasing headwinds in corporate banking?

Patty Hines

Post by

Oct 13th, 2015

This week I’m in Singapore, which provides a beautiful backdrop for Sibos 2015, the annual conference that brings together thousands of business leaders, decision makers and topic experts from a range of financial institutions, market infrastructures, multinational corporations and technology partners.


This year’s conference theme is connect, debate and collaborate and takes place at a time of increasing headwinds from a slowing global economy, higher compliance costs, increasingly global corporates, and competition from both banks and nonbanks alike. I spent the past few months taking a deep dive into corporate banking performance over the past 10 years–a period of both tremendous growth and unprecedented upheaval. As expected, corporate banking operating income and customer deposit balances have experienced healthy growth rates over the past 10 years. But surprisingly, despite increases in customer deposits, corporate banking income was largely stagnant over the past few years.

Corporate Banking Income and Deposits

Corporate banking plays a dominant role for the largest global banks. In 2014, corporate banking was responsible for 33% of overall operating income and 38% of customer deposits across the 20 banks included in this analysis.

As outlined in the new Celent report, Corporate Banking: Driving Growth in the Face of Increasing Headwinds, this critical banking sector is shaped by four external forces: economic conditions, the regulatory environment, business demographics, and financial technology. These same factors are slowing corporate banking growth and creating an environment in which banks are overhauling client offerings in the face of regulatory pressure, re-evaluating geographic footprints in response to shifting trade flows, and investing in technologies to ensure a consistent, integrated customer experience.

Much of the discussion at Sibos is on exploring transformation in the face of disruption. As they look to an unsettled future, corporate banks that are flexible, adaptable, and creative will be the ones that succeed. Changing time-tested ways of doing business is painful, but critical for future success.

Helping build the fintech ecosystem in Latin America

Juan Mazzini

Post by

Sep 30th, 2015

A few weeks ago, Dan Latimore and I had the chance to attend Finnosummit in Mexico City.

IMG_1341 While Dan was the one really working (he presented on “How Big Data can change Financial Services”) I mingled around the participants of this vibrant ecosystem encompassing entrepreneurs, financial institutions, investors, and regulators among other stakeholders. It is amazing how the ecosystem continues to grow and how fintech start-ups are booming.IMG_1349





Celent has been collaborating to help create the fintech ecosystem in the Latin American region since its inception and I had the honor, for 2nd time, to judge the fintech start-ups participating in the BBVA Open Talent, which brought the Latin American finalists into town as part of Finnosummit. They had their 5 minutes of glory (or suffering) by pitching their venture to the audience and two winners were selected at the end of the day. Discover the finalists of all regions here.

In Latin America two chilean start-ups were the winners:, aiming to financial inclusion by creating a credit scoring based on utility payments; and Bitnexo which enables fast, easy and low cost transfers between Asia and Latin America, using Bitcoin.

In the US & RoW the two winners were: ModernLend enables users with no credit profile to create one in just 6 months by using alternate metrics; and LendingFront which facilitates short term commercial lending through a simple platform.

In Europa the winners were Everledger, specialized in anti-fraud technology for financial services and insurance; and Origin an electronic platform that facilitates bond issuing in the capital markets.

Many fintech startups that made it to the finals focus on Blockchain technology and payments. These seem to be the areas of major investment for the last two years. If you are interested in these themes I suggest that you follow my colleagues John Dwyer, Zilvinas Bareisis and Gareth Lodge.

Coming back to Dan’s presentation, he made a very interesting observation around the need to move from the old paradigm (Customer response optimization) to a new paradigm (Anticipate and shape customer intent) based on the use of big data and analytics, but also warning that disruptors are out there applying the new paradigm today.

If you want to get deeper into any of the subjects covered here, please let me know. By the way, is there any fintech start-up you believe has great potential? Share with us please!

Customer experience for financial services

Patty Hines

Post by

Sep 30th, 2015

Service Design. Journey Maps. Customer Stories. Mood Boards. Experience Recovery. These are a handful of the topics discussed at this week’s Customer Experience for Financial Services (CXFS) Conference, organized by Worldwide Business Research in Charlotte, NC. As an analyst currently immersed in research on corporate banking financial performance, regulatory environment, economic conditions, business demographics, and financial technology, the CXFS event was a welcome change of scenery.

Journey Mapping

Journey Mapping

The CXFS conference was all about the “voice of the customer” (VoC) and how financial institutions (FIs) can improve their customer “listening” skills. One of the sessions mentioned that FIs are listening to anywhere from four to ten channels including web site, call center, e-mail, Internet, customer surveys and social media. But as one presenter stated, having more VoC channels doesn’t automatically result in a better customer experience.

For example, in recent years many global banks fully integrated their major lines of business with product, operations and technology grouped organized under one segment leader. These integrated groups have created silos which create a highly verticalized client experience (CX), preventing consistency across a firm. Event attendees were encouraged to “climb over the silos and create a collective story to make things change”.

Customer experience strategy and technology have gone a long way since I was involved in online banking user interface design in the early 2000s. Technology providers at the event are enabling banks to digitize and tag unstructured data such as call center recordings, agent notes, e-mails, and social media posts. This enables firms to mine and analyze the data to inform customer-centric innovation. Other firms specialized in market research including voice of the customer and voice of the employee surveys. Customer experience consultants are helping firms to understand how customers are thinking, feeling, seeing, saying doing and hearing so that people, processes, products and technology can be improved.

The event featured discussions on how to build CX into people, processes and products by creating centralized information stores, centers of excellence, customer councils, and shared KPIs. Most of the FIs at CXFS were early in their customer experience journey and still working out a comprehensive solution. My favorite quote of the event was advice from Ingrid Lindberg, CXO of “Have the patience of a saint, the heart of a lion, and the tenacity of a street fighter because it is one giant game of Whack-a-Mole.”

Why banks should pay attention to “Assistant as an App”

Stephen Greer

Post by

Sep 22nd, 2015

Last week I had the pleasure of going to Finovate, a biannual event (at least in NA) where startups and established vendors show off their newest creations. My colleague Dan Latimore wrote an in-depth piece about it last week. It’s usually a good temperature read of where the market is and what banks are thinking about. PFM used to be hot, now it barely makes an appearance. Mobile account opening and on-boarding was massive. Each year you can count on a few presentations tackling customer communication, whether it´s customer service applications or advisory tools. While this year was no different, I didn´t see any presentations representing an emerging trend in mobile: assistant as an app.

What is assistant as an app? Basically, it puts a thin UI between two humans: the customer and the service provider (e.g. retailer or bank). The UI layer enhances the interaction by allowing each party to push information back and forth, whether its text, pictures, data visualization, etc. There are a wide range of possibilities.

Apps are already starting to incorporate this idea. For a monthly fee, Pana offerings a human personal travel assistant who will take care of any travel related need. The concierge books restaurants, hotels, rental cars, and flights, all via in-app communication.


Vida Health allows users to push dietary information to a health coach that can then send back health plans, ideas to diagnose health issues, or create a weight loss regimen. The dating app Grouper uses a concierge to coordinate group dates. EasilyDo is a personal assistant that can manage your contacts, check traffic, schedule flights, etc. The app Fetch uses SMS to let users ask the concierge to buy just about anything.

For a small fee (sometimes free, subsidized by business or premium services) these companies provide value-added premium services to customers through a mobile device. The applicability for banks is obvious. Finances can be complicated; most people aren´t good at managing money, and according to Celent research, consumers still prefer to speak to a human for important money matters. Assistant as an app would offer institutions a clear path towards monetising the mobile channel, moving interactions away from the branch, and capturing a growing base of digitally-directed consumers. I predict this will be a major trend in financial services in the future.

What do you think? Feel free to comment below.

Mobile, onboarding among dominant themes at FinovateFall 2015

Dan Latimore

Post by

Sep 18th, 2015

When I’m feeling a bit flip, I tell clients that Celent goes to a lot of conferences so that they don’t have to. Don’t get me wrong: conferences are worthwhile, and you have a lot of serendipitous conversations. But they’re also time away from the office, and, to be honest, not every minute is completely productive. With that in mind, I’ll describe my very-high level takeaways of Finovate Fall 2015, held earlier this week at the New York Hilton.

As I listened to each of the 70 7-minute pitches (2 presenters scratched), I tagged them in an unscientific way. Each company received two to eight words describing the space the problem they were solving and how they did it. Here’s the resulting word cloud:

Finovate Word Cloud

Mobile, unsurprisingly, dominated. I was astonished, however, at the prominence of “onboarding,” a term I used to cover a wide variety of solutions pertaining to account opening, from ID verification to assisted form filling. Many talked about eliminating friction, and creating a platform to support a particular service. Security and Fraud were prominent, as was the concept of components, often enabled by APIs.

The biggest surprise: only two companies addressed Blockchain technology – perhaps that will change at FinovateSpring.

Somewhere around the 60th presentation, I was struck by the variability in presentation skills and solution excellence. Being a consultant, I had to create a 2×2, below. What did we miss because the product or service was presented sub-optimally?

Finally, a big thanks to the folks at Finovate – Celent values our partnership with this great event. If you’d like more detail, check out their blog, which describes the best in show winners.

What did you like at Finovate?

Viewing mobile payments strategy holistically

Sep 17th, 2015

As the one year anniversary of Apple Pay approaches, banks have to make more decisions about their mobile payments strategy. Android Pay launched in the US a few days ago, and Samsung Pay is expected to be available there soon as well. Should a bank just stick with Apple Pay or enable their cards with all the “pays?” Should they consider alternative options, such as their own HCE-based, or depending on the market, even SIM-based NFC solutions?

The answer is that banks have to view their mobile payments strategy holistically. Apple Pay, good as it is, is only available for the latest iOS devices, and only for in-store and in-app payments. Android ecosystem offers more choice: Android Pay, Samsung Pay, HCE and SIM for NFC, but what about P2P and other payments?

Barclays in the UK announced this week that it will be launching its own version of mobile payments for Android-based phones. Barclays was a notable absentee when Apple Pay launched in the UK, and are forging ahead with Pingit and bPay wearables. As a result, some view this latest move as yet another indication that the bank “appears to be adopting a go-it-alone strategy with its roll-out of mobile payments, preferring to retain the primary contact with the customer rather than providing the rails for interlopers like Apple, Google and Samsung to hitch a free ride.”

I wouldn’t read too much into it. Barclays has since said that it would support Apple Pay at some point in the future. In my view, Barclays is doing what all banks should do – think about mobile payments holistically, i.e. how they will support mobile payments across different platforms and use cases (e.g. in-store, in-app, P2P, etc.).

Yes, Android Pay has been launched in the US, but it’s not yet available in the UK. Yet HCE technology has given banks around the world an opportunity to launch their own branded NFC solutions for Android, irrespective of whether Android Pay is available in their market or not. Rather than waiting for Android Pay or Samsung Pay to come to the UK, Barclays is joining the growing list of banks such as BBVA in Spain (read the case study of BBVA Wallet, our Model Bank winner here), RBC in Canada (who were granted a patent for their Secure Cloud payments earlier this month), and others that are taking a proactive stance in developing mobile offerings for their Android user base.

I have a new report coming out soon that covers key digital payments issues, such as Android Pay and tokenisation in more detail. Watch this space!

Execution: the Achilles Heel of cool new stuff

Dan Latimore

Post by

Sep 16th, 2015

I’m heading into Finovate in a couple of hours. The UN general assembly is in town, and the only reasonable Starwood hotel I could find was the Aloft in Harlem. It’s amazing that this hotel has exactly the same feel as its counterpart at the Denver Airport…but I digress.

I’m writing because Aloft has a cool feature called Keyless Entry. Very simply, I checked in on my SPG app, was given my room (which puzzled the clerk as I tried to check in again – apparently I didn’t even need to stop at the front desk), and my phone was to serve as my key. Brilliant in theory, but in practice I overshot my floor on the elevator because I couldn’t activate the security pad quickly enough, and getting into my room and the health club took several swipes (5-10 seconds) each time.

So while I like ditching the plastic key, that convenience is more than outweighed by the hassle of having to call up the app (which takes 5-10 seconds itself to load) and then match it to the pad. I’m using a plastic key next time.

Another great idea is using a phone’s camera to capture data, most notably a U.S. driver’s license. I love the demos I’ve seen at prior Finovate events, but when I’ve tried it to open new accounts, it simply didn’t work.

Just to show I’m not wholly negative, I also activated my BofA TouchID login today. It worked beautifully, and now I can stop typing in a truly secure password with my thumbs! BofA waited until they got it right (at least for me!).

What’s the moral? When rolling something new out, you’d better be sure that it works. Few consumers will give you a second chance, at least not anytime soon, particularly when the alternative is almost as good and the experience is tried and true.

Why digital appointment booking will be commonplace in three years

Bob Meara

Post by

Sep 15th, 2015

A friend of mine is a successful small business owner in his forties. Like so many in his demographic, Bryan developed a longing to own a Harley Davidson. He could easily afford a Harley, but chose to seek financing instead. Getting this business should have been a walk in the park for his bank.

Bryan is a digitally-driven consumer who values convenience. With some frustration in his voice, he shared with me his disappointment that he couldn’t simply arrange for a loan on his bank’s mobile app. With resignation, he stopped by a local branch only to find the staff members engaged with other customers. After a few moments of impatient waiting, he chose to leave and return the following day. His second trip met with an identical outcome. With increased frustration, Bryan called his bank while en route to a business appointment, hoping for a straightforward way to quickly close on a loan. Instead, the cheerful staff member explained that Bryan could simply visit any branch at his convenience to close on the loan in about an hour. Bryan’s bank lost his business to a credit union.

Bryan’s experience is probably not unique. His bank would have won his business easily – had they simply offered him an opportunity to engage with them on his terms. While certainly no panacea, digital appointment booking would have been exactly that. And, it would have been exactly what Bryan expected from his bank. After all, he makes appointments to see his accountant, healthcare provider and barber and books dinner reservations similarly.

But, few financial institutions offer their customers this ability (Figure 1). The idea has recently caught on among the largest North American banks, while 40% of surveyed midsized institutions say they are “considering” the idea. Meanwhile, 70% of community banks (assets less than $1 billion) have no plans to implement. That’s going to change.

OAB adoptionSource: Celent survey of North American financial institutions, October 2014, n=156

The benefits of digital appointments are manifest. Among them:

  • Convenience: Customers avoid unnecessary waiting for service by scheduling an appointment on their terms and at their convenience while online – where much shopping occurs. A worst case scenario is the customer who, after a lengthy wait, discovers the bank resource with the requisite skills and licensing to meet their needs is not on site.
  • Capacity planning: Sales and service interactions have historically been more difficult to forecast than teller transactions. Digital appointment booking provides a much-needed view into future demand for sales and service resources and improves an institution’s ability to plan accordingly.
  • Sales impact: Automated product origination platforms have been effective at facilitating self-service enrollment of simple products, such as checking and savings accounts. But many institutions see an opportunity to improve close rates of more complex sales such as mortgage loans or investment products that began with customers interacting with the bank online. Knowing that many customers would be more comfortable with in-person discussions in these cases, digital appointment booking offers a concrete next step for interested prospects.

A perhaps less obvious benefit of digital appointment booking is its favorable impact on institutions’ face-to-face interaction. Said simply, frontline employees are better equipped for sales and service interactions when they know who is coming and for what reason. More commonly, bankers must offer an impromptu response to walk-up interactions. A minority of institutions equip frontline staff with a “customer snapshot,” or optimally a “next-best action” recommendation, but that information is not available to staff until customers authenticate. With essentially no time to react to the information, consistency of service delivery is a tall order.

To coin an overly-used expression, it’s not rocket science.

Practice what you preach?

Gareth Lodge

Post by

Sep 14th, 2015

This is the next – I have a terrible feeling its not the last though – of seeing the cards world through the eyes of a consumer.

The story so far is contained in three previous posts, with the last reporting that my card details were skimmed (we assume) in the US. This post however looks at the experience at home.

As a consumer, we often get warnings from our banks about phishing attacks – we will never do this, our emails will look like this, etc.

Then consider what a daily average inbox looks like – full of identical emails from fraudsters, often better written, and better laid out. Furthermore, banks only focus on emails and outbound calls. I’m possibly wrong, but I’m fairly sure never had the same warnings about text messages, tweets etc. Consider then these channels and how many spam messages you get on a daily basis. (It’s probably ok though, as all the PPI claims I’m told I have should more than compensate me for all the recent accidents I’m alleged to have been in!)

Saturday afternoon I received this text:


Note that it comes from a mobile number, and texts from my card provider have their details in the text.

I deleted it, assuming it was spam, and that if I replied I’d be signed up to some premium rate text service…again.

Something made me pause, so I rang my card company, using the number that I already had. And I was right to do so, as it was from them. Thats why I’ve blurred the full number – this is an active line that they are using, but don’t advertise

They seemed surprised that I was querying the method, yet when I asked how many people responded to texts, they seemed less certain (to be fair, it was a call center operator!).

As a consumer, I appreciate the attempt to make it as seamless and easy as possible. Yet it contradicts the advice we’re given. It would be very simple to text people randomly and ask them personal detail to confirm who they are or to log into a man-in-the-middle website.

It feels a little chicken and egg. Consumers need educating. Explaining that the layers of security are providing them protection. At the same time, banks need to think about how consumers will – or should – view their messaging.

Given the nature of the message, and the reputational issues, I wonder whether it’s time for the banks collectively to find a solution. Detecting fraud and managing it could be a competitive differentiator – or it could prove far more powerful to do collectively. Across providers, across channels, across products. Best practice across the industry surely has got to benefit everyone long term?


Unbundling, Fidor, and the model for approaching financial startups

Stephen Greer

Post by

Sep 9th, 2015

I´ve recently had multiple conversations with financial institutions about the trend of unbundling financial services by FinTech startups. In fact, it’s hard to discuss the future of the industry without touching on it. Articles from Tanay Jaipuria, Tech Crunch, and CBInsights speak openly about inexorable disruption. They all tell a fairly similar story. Unbundled products and services disintermediate financial institutions by improving on traditional offerings. Banks lose that value chain. Banks become a utility on the back end, essentially forced by the market to provide the necessary regulatory requirements and accounts for nonbank disruptors. With images like this (see below), it’s hard to argue that it isn’t happening—at least at some level.


There are plenty of reasons to be skeptical about the hype surrounding disruption by FinTech players (shallow revenue, small customer base, etc.), but even if only a few manage to become sizable competitors, that still represents a significant threat to banks´ existing revenue streams. There’s also data pointing to higher adoption in the future. A study from Ipsos MediaCT and LinkedIn showed that 55% of millennials and 67% of affluent millennials are open to using non-FS offerings for financial services. This number is surprisingly high, and the largest banks in the world are paying attention.

The threat of losing the customer-facing side of the business is a legitimate risk that banks face over the next 5-10 years. But there´s a possible solution that could enable banks to remain relevant even as they begin to see some of their legacy products or services fall to new entrants: be more like Fidor Bank.

Fidor Bank is a privately held neobank launched in Germany. It has a banking license and wants to transform the way financial institutions interact with their customers by creating a sense of community and openness. The bank views its platform, fidorOS, as a key differentiator that allows it to offer customers services from start-ups or new financial instruments. For example, it offers its customers Currency Cloud for foreign exchange as well as the ability to view Bitcoin through its platform.

Going forward, it may make more sense for financial institutions to take this approach. Banks can´t be everything to their customers, and there´s a healthy stream of market entrants trying to chip away at the banking value chain. A middle way is that banks become an aggregator for popular nonbank FinTech offerings as they become popular. This would preserve the benefits of traditional bundling by aggregating offerings and re-bundling them alongside its home grown services. Some benefits include:

  • Maintain the consumer facing side of the business by letting customers access these service through your platform
  • Increase cross-selling and marketing opportunities
  • Preserve a convenient and frictionless experience by reducing the fragmentation of unbundling

These benefits would provide value to both the FI and the FinTech partner, and it´s not a new concept. Netflix is effectively an aggregator of content from a variety of production companies (along with creating great content of their own). The music industry has been offering bundled services for more than a decade. Banks are loath to forfeit parts of the business, but as other industries have seen, the longer they wait the more disruptive the change will be.