Why diversity abounds in new branch designs

Why diversity abounds in new branch designs
Branch channel transformation is a complex and expensive undertaking. For all its complexity, however, there are at least two certainties. Namely:
  1. It is no longer optional
  2. There is no single blueprint
It is the rich diversity in approaches taken to the important task of improving branch channel efficiency and effectiveness that makes this topic so fascinating. Retail financial institutions need to possess a number of core competencies to remain successful. Among them is omnichannel delivery. For this reason, Celent launched two research panels in 2015, one devoted to digital banking and another focused on branch transformation. No Longer Optional In its first Branch Transformation Panel survey, 81% of financial institutions regarded branch transformation as an imperative. After roughly a decade of talk but little action, we are encouraged by banks’ embracing the need to get going. They’re not alone. Retailers of all shapes and sizes are wrestling with how to deliver a compelling and differentiated omnichannel experience, what that means in their stores and how to manage a rapidly changing cost-to-serve. The rapid pace of change increases both the uncertainty and sense of urgency. One only needs to consider the meteoric rise of mobile engagement (Figure 1). Things are not what they were just three years ago. Channel systems designed ten years ago aren’t the answer to tomorrow’s challenges! mobile usage chart No Single Blueprint While institutions may be aligned on the importance of getting on with branch channel transformation, there is much diversity of thought around what this actually means. Most banks appear to associate branch channel transformation with “radical changes” in the branch operating model. Arguably, for many banks, radical changes are needed. Not everyone sees it this way (Figure 2). branch meaning This diversity of opinion is to be expected. It stems from diversity in a number of factors: an institutions’ brand equity, desired customer experience, target market, legacy system capability and a host of other factors. The most distinguishing factor may be the willingness (or not) of each institution to intentionally disrupt its business model before someone else does. If you liked banking because it was slow-moving and predictable, the next few years will be stressful for you! Celent is accepting additional requests for membership in the Branch Transformation Research Panel and expects to field ongoing research through 2016 at semi-monthly intervals. To request to be on the panel, apply here.  
Bob Meara About Bob Meara

Bob Meara is a senior analyst with Celent's banking practice and is based in Atlanta, Georgia. His research focuses on the branch and ATM delivery channels, customer analytics and check and cash payment processing technologies. A well known authority on remote deposit capture, Bob has led multiple consulting engagements including proprietary research projects involving financial services hardware, software and the impact of self-service on branch banking.

Before joining Celent, Bob was the director of product marketing at Alogent. In this role, he positioned and launched a series of Check 21 payments solutions.

Prior to Alogent, Bob also held positions in marketing and brand management at BellSouth, Hayes Corporation, and Procter & Gamble in addition to being a commissioned naval officer.

Bob earned a Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University.

Speak Your Mind

*