Model Bank nominations deadline extended to December 11th

Model Bank nominations deadline extended to December 11th
Today we announced that we are extending the deadline to submit nominations for Model Bank 2016 awards until December 11th. Thank you to all of you who already submitted, and to those who told us that you are working on your submissions. We appreciate that this is a busy time of the year for everyone, and we hope that the extra time will make it easier for you and your clients to submit the initiatives. And of course, it’s not too late to get started if you would like to share how your bank is using technology in a differentiating way. You can see more details on the Model Bank program in my earlier blog, or better yet, by going to the initiative nomination page online and downloading a complimentary report, Becoming a Model Bank: A Guide to Winning Celent’s Main Award for Financial Institutions. Don’t forget, in addition to bragging rights for winning the most prestigious Celent’s Banking award, you also have the case study of your initiative featured in our reports and receive complimentary invitations to Celent’s flagship event, Insight and Innovation Day in New York. 2015 was a sold-out event, and 2016 promises to be even better. It will be on April 13th 2016 at the Museum of American Finance. Tickets are already selling fast, so submit your initiatives now for a chance of winning the Model Bank award and free entry, or register here.

Reconciling TouchID with Bank T&Cs

Reconciling TouchID with Bank T&Cs
Apple’s TouchID is brilliant – I now use it not only to unlock my phone, but also to log into my Amazon account. I can also use it to log into my Amex app and my bank’s mobile banking app. And of course, it is the way to initiate Apple Pay transactions. The only trouble is that none of those providers can be assured that it is really me doing all of this. TouchID allows registering up to 10 different fingerprints, and authenticates the user locally by matching his or her fingerprint to the registered templates. However, authentication is not the same as identity – banks and other apps know it is someone authorised to use that phone, but they don’t know it’s me, Zil Bareisis. It is likely to be me, but it could also be my wife or my kids. It could even be a total stranger if in some bizarre bout of insanity, I allowed them to register their fingerprint with my phone. The Telegraph reported last week that the UK banks are very much aware of this issue and have decided to take a hard stance:
“Banks have warned customers that if they store other people’s fingerprints on their iPhones they will be treated as if they have failed to keep their personal details safe.
This means the bank can decline to refund disputed transactions or refuse to help where customers claim they have been victims of fraud.”
According to the paper, “the banks’ position is typically buried in the detail of bank account Ts & Cs”, something as we all know that most people accept without reading in detail. I can appreciate the banks’ concerns, but I wonder if they are somewhat overblown. Although this will change in time, most of Apple Pay transactions in the UK are still capped at the contactless limit (£30). Any of my family members today can take my contactless card and use it as contactless without any PIN. I haven’t heard too many suggestions that I should keep my card locked away from my family members. However, if this were to happen, I should be prepared to accept my family’s transactions and not report them as fraud. I am no legal expert, but it doesn’t feel like inserting protective statements within T&Cs is the way forward. First, it’s not very transparent. Second, if the issue were to arise, it is something that would not be easy for banks to prove. Could consumers just delete all the other fingerprints in case of a dispute? Finally, it’s just poor customer service. Instead, banks should invest into educating consumers about digital technologies and how to use them safely and responsibly. Even if it’s as basic as, “don’t allow strangers to register their fingerprints on your phone” and “be prepared to accept your family’s transactions and not dispute them as fraud.” As the value of Apple Pay transactions grows, banks ought to consider deploying additional techniques, such as behavioural analysis to authenticate the users and minimise fraud. As with most security, multi-layered approach is likely to work best.

Looking back on Money 20/20

Looking back on Money 20/20
Last week my colleague Dan Latimore and I were at Money 20/20, which in four short years has become a “must attend” event in payments and Fintech. I’ve been there at the very beginning and it has been exciting to watch it grow from about 1,000 of us in the first year to over 10,000 this year. Congratulations to the Money 20/20 team for this incredible achievement! And thank you to all of those who took time out of their busy schedules to meet with us. As I was reflecting back on the last week, I realised that it’s no longer possible to take in all of Money 20/20. In the first year, even with parallel session tracks, you could absorb a lot of what was happening “by osmosis”, just walking the floors of Aria. As the event grew and moved to a much more spacious Venetian, somewhat paradoxically, the experiences got more individual, depending on which sessions and keynotes you attended, which booths you visited and which people you met. Here are some of my key takeaways:
  1. Perhaps the biggest and most talked-about announcement of the show was Chase Pay and its partnership with MCX. Chase is developing a wallet that will be available to all of its 94 million cardholders to use in-store, in-app and online. The wallet is not planning to use NFC at the POS, with QR codes set to be a most likely method, and as a result will be available on any smartphone device, irrespective of its operating system. On the merchant side, Chase is offering a fixed fee processing which will make merchant costs more reliable and predictable with an opportunity to “earn it down” based on volume. Partnership with MCX gives Chase Pay access to the largest merchants in the country. In addition to a stand-alone app, Chase Pay will also be available as a payment option inside CurrentC, the wallet that MCX has been piloting in Columbus OH, the results of which were presented and greeted with a tentative applause during another keynote at Money 20/20.
  2. Mobile payments market in the US is only getting more complex, with Apple Pay, Android Pay and Samsung Pay already there, more “Pays” on the way (e.g. LG Pay), and now Chase Pay and revived expectations of CurrentC. Make no mistake – while most “pays” look similar, they offer a different customer experience (e.g. how to trigger payment, where it is accepted, etc.) and require issuers to adapt their processes to each of them. At the show, I picked up strong signals from issuers that they want to have more control over digital payments and are looking at various options, including HCE wallets, to achieve that.
  3. The Tokenisation panel was one of the best sessions I attended with panelists from the networks, issuers, merchants and processors sharing their views how tokenisation is going to evolve. It includes tokenisation for cards-on-file and e-commerce transactions (both Visa and MasterCard announced tokenisation of their Checkout and MasterPass wallets respectively), new approach to 3D Secure, introduction of Payment Account Reference (PAR) – a non transactable ID that ties together all the tokens, and tokenisation for DDAs which The Clearing House is working on. According the panelists, tokenisation is the much-needed “abstraction layer” that will be a “foundation for the next 20 years of innovation.”
  4. Biometrics are entering mainstream, with FIDO alliance laying the groundwork for how to deploy biometrics for authentication. Sorting through a myriad of biometrics providers and approaches (e.g. fingerprints, hands, voice, eyes, etc.) is a headache and eventually, it will be consumers that will decide which approach works best for them. FIDO alliance delivers a standard irrespective of what the consumers choose. Looking into the future, the panelists envisaged a behavioural approach where the providers use a number of data points to constantly verify that the user behaviour is consistent with a typical pattern and authenticates automatically in the background, a process called “ambient authentication.”
  5. Conversations about cryptocurrencies have matured enormously over the last 12-18 months. The focus is now very clearly on blockchain technology and how the financial services industry can best deploy it. A number of exciting partnerships are emerging in this space, from TD Bank and RBC working with Ripple on domestic and cross-border P2P payments as well as more efficient transfers between subsidiaries, to Nasdaq’s partnership with Chain, to the R3 consortium. Perhaps the most exciting demo I’ve seen was Visa’s connected car experience, where the driver could review the new leasing document on the screen, sign it, register it on a blockchain and drive off. Time will tell if this is how we will be getting to drive cars in the future, but it only shows the opportunities out there.
Finally, I’ve been asking others at the show what they thought were the key themes. Interestingly, two themes came up very consistently – innovation and focus on customer experience. The latter manifests itself in so many different ways, from making it easy and intuitive for consumers to pay to solving very specific merchant problems, whether it’s around acceptance and security (Verifone, Ingenico, Poynt), conversion rates (BlueSnap, Affirm), lending (PayPal, LendUp) or seamless integration of payments into the overall proposition (Stripe, First Data). The third theme seemed to be a little more contentious. Some said it was all about disruption, while others talked about collaboration. I actually agree with both – to me they are two sides of the same coin. The disruption in FS is real, but many find that the way to deal with it is through collaboration. Few, if any, have talked about demolishing the world as we know it today; instead, all are focused on how to make it better. I know I only scratched the surface here. For example, there were also some very interesting announcements about domestic P2P/push payments such as Early Warning buying clearXchange, Dwolla partnering with CME Group, and The Clearing House working with Vocalink. And companies like Earthport, PayCommerce and Ripple are making an impact on cross-border payments. But as I said, it’s impossible to take it all in, and no write-up can do full justice to Money 20/20 – you just have to be there… See you next year in Vegas or perhaps even in Copenhagen at Money 20/20 Europe!

First thoughts on marriage between Visa Inc. and Visa Europe

First thoughts on marriage between Visa Inc. and Visa Europe
Today Visa Inc. announced it would be acquiring Visa Europe, subject to regulatory approvals. The press release is here; the executive team also held an investor call earlier today – the recording and the presentation are here. The deal was widely expected, and so should not be a surprise to anyone who follows payments. Still, it poses a number of questions, such as, for example, how effective the combined entity will be in dealing with intricacies of the European market, and whether this would lead to the Europeans calling (again) for a new separate pan-European card scheme. It’s true the European payments market has unique dynamics in terms of regulation and competition, both in cards and in payments more broadly. PSD2 will have profound effects on the existing market players, including Visa. Depending on the final interpretations, some provisions such as scheme and processing separation requirement might introduce undesirable complexities to the integrated Visa. However, I am sure none of this news to Visa’s management and they must have a plan for how to deal with the regional challenges. Visa has committed to maintaining a strong European presence, including an “empowered European leadership team and in-country resources”, “local data center”, and “differentiated country and regional strategies.” Furthermore, the potential synergies are real – a more consistent product set and fewer duplicated efforts should help Visa drive innovation and move to digital on a global basis.​​​ Visa also said it was planning to incur up to $500 million of integration-related costs over the next 4-5 years, most of which would go towards integrating Visa Inc. and Visa Europe systems. In the past, I have seen on occasions Visa Europe appealing to European banks by playing up its ownership structure in Europe and contrasting it to the global approach of MasterCard. This argument is now gone – both networks will be global commercial entities. Would this re-open calls for a pan-European card scheme? I had a look at this issue a few years ago in the Celent report, “In Search of a Third European Card Scheme” and concluded that it was “time to move on.” I still stand by that conclusion today; in my view, it has always been a politically motivated initiative, with no particularly clear business rationale. When “plastic” was the main/ only form of electronic payment, it at least made more sense to consider various options. Now, the world is changing rapidly, as digital payments and real-time networks between bank accounts emerge. Let’s hope that the European banks will find better use for their financial windfall from this transaction than trying to create a new pan-European card network. Given the original “put” option, it was always more a question of “when” rather than “if”. Congratulations to Visa team for deciding to move forward with the deal. P.S. Stay tuned for my reflections on last week’s Money 20/20; I was planning to post those today as well, but Visa’s deal prompted a number of inquiries, so wanted to offer a few thoughts on that first.

Musings from the airplane

Musings from the airplane
I am not writing this literally on the plane, but I might well be – this is a conference season, so many of us are on the road. My colleagues have already been blogging from SIBOS, Finovate, Finnosummit and other events. I wanted to share my own observations from the events I attended. EMV, tokenisation, mobile, Blockchain – these were just a few major themes discussed in depth in Las Vegas at PayThink. This used to be known as ATM, Debit and Prepaid Forum and remains THE event to go to discuss these topics in the United States. It is organised by PaymentsSource and chaired (for the last 12 years!) by Tony Hayes, my colleague and Partner at Oliver Wyman. Thank you to the organisers for inviting me to moderate a panel on lessons learned from cards platform transformations, and many thanks to my panelists – senior executives from FIS and e-Global for sharing their insights. We talked about the drivers forcing processors and issuers to upgrade their processing platforms, such as growing transaction volumes and types, need for flexibility and speed when adding new products, and how the processing proposition changes. Processors are now moving away from out-of-the box to componentised solutions, are changing how they package and price their services, and are re-thinking the business terms how to engage with clients. When working with software vendors, our panelists stressed the importance of “soft aspects”. Of course, the technology matters and must meet the requirements to get you on the short list. However, often it will be your people that will win or lose you the deal – flexibility and commitment they demonstrate during proof of concept and other advanced stage interactions are often major factors when clients make a final decision. Last week I was in Lithuania, the country I grew up in and left over 20 years ago… I go back every year, but this was the first time I went there as an analyst. The Central Banks of Lithuania and Sweden jointly organised a conference on the role of Non-Banks in the Payments Market. I was kindly invited to join the panel to discuss “what’s in the future.” As our clients know, our view at Celent is that the disruption in banking is real and that, as a result, banking will change, however, banks will not disappear. Of course, some of them will, but others will adapt, and some of the today’s non-banks will become banks. The challenge for all is how best to manage that tension and the ongoing evolution of the industry. In between travels, I also published a new report on tokenisation, a hot topic in the industry at the moment. The speed of tokenisation evolution in the last 12-18 months has been remarkable, and there are no signs of slowing down. Celent clients can access the report here. Finally, it’s not long before we board the plane to go back to Vegas to Money 2020. The meteoric rise of this event has been absolutely amazing – fours years ago there were about 1,200 of us; this year, the organisers expect 10,000! My colleague Dan Latimore and I will again be there as well. My diary is already full, but if you are a client and would like to say hello, do reach out to your account managers and we’ll do our best to meet up. With everything going digital, the physical handshake remains as important as ever! Safe travels!

Viewing mobile payments strategy holistically

Viewing mobile payments strategy holistically
As the one year anniversary of Apple Pay approaches, banks have to make more decisions about their mobile payments strategy. Android Pay launched in the US a few days ago, and Samsung Pay is expected to be available there soon as well. Should a bank just stick with Apple Pay or enable their cards with all the “pays?” Should they consider alternative options, such as their own HCE-based, or depending on the market, even SIM-based NFC solutions? The answer is that banks have to view their mobile payments strategy holistically. Apple Pay, good as it is, is only available for the latest iOS devices, and only for in-store and in-app payments. Android ecosystem offers more choice: Android Pay, Samsung Pay, HCE and SIM for NFC, but what about P2P and other payments? Barclays in the UK announced this week that it will be launching its own version of mobile payments for Android-based phones. Barclays was a notable absentee when Apple Pay launched in the UK, and are forging ahead with Pingit and bPay wearables. As a result, some view this latest move as yet another indication that the bank “appears to be adopting a go-it-alone strategy with its roll-out of mobile payments, preferring to retain the primary contact with the customer rather than providing the rails for interlopers like Apple, Google and Samsung to hitch a free ride.” I wouldn’t read too much into it. Barclays has since said that it would support Apple Pay at some point in the future. In my view, Barclays is doing what all banks should do – think about mobile payments holistically, i.e. how they will support mobile payments across different platforms and use cases (e.g. in-store, in-app, P2P, etc.). Yes, Android Pay has been launched in the US, but it’s not yet available in the UK. Yet HCE technology has given banks around the world an opportunity to launch their own branded NFC solutions for Android, irrespective of whether Android Pay is available in their market or not. Rather than waiting for Android Pay or Samsung Pay to come to the UK, Barclays is joining the growing list of banks such as BBVA in Spain (read the case study of BBVA Wallet, our Model Bank winner here), RBC in Canada (who were granted a patent for their Secure Cloud payments earlier this month), and others that are taking a proactive stance in developing mobile offerings for their Android user base. I have a new report coming out soon that covers key digital payments issues, such as Android Pay and tokenisation in more detail. Watch this space!

First-time success rate of my Apple Pay transactions today: 0%

First-time success rate of my Apple Pay transactions today: 0%
Yes, you did read this right – today I could not complete a single Apple Pay transaction successfully first time. This was my experience today:
  • I tried using Apple Pay five times – four times to get in and out of the London transport network and once at a coffee shop to buy an espresso.
  • Not once did I manage to complete the transaction right away.
  • Only once I could complete the transaction via the fingerprint. And before you accuse me of sweaty fingers, on all occasions I made extra efforts to wipe clean my phone’s TouchID reader and my fingers before approaching the terminal. And while I did have some issues with TouchID in the past, now the fingerprint unlocks the phone just fine most of the time.
  • Three other times, I had to type in my password, which then completed the transaction.
  • I could not get my coffee on Apple Pay at all – no matter what I did, the transaction would not go through. My default card is Amex, so I asked the merchant if they accepted Amex cards in the first place (I couldn’t see any obvious signs that they did). He confirmed that they accepted Amex, but not if the card was contactless! Which I guess explains my lack of success in that instance, but there was no way of me knowing it in advance – the shop clearly had contactless terminals, so I assumed my Amex inside Apple Pay would work just fine. In the end, I embarrassingly put my phone away and paid cash.
OK, I admit, the sample size is not big – only five transactions and I haven’t tried a diverse POS environment (TfL and a coffee shop), so maybe I’ve just been unlucky. But it’s not the first time this is happening to me. I already highlighted my trepidation of going up with Apple Pay to the tube gates in an earlier blog. And I had other bad experiences: after trying to pay with Apple Pay and failing at a local Co-op shop, I was told that I couldn’t just use a plastic contactless card or pay by cash – I had to insert my actual Amex card into the reader and type in the PIN code to complete the transaction. Really?? Looks like I am not alone struggling with Apple Pay in the UK, as this Twitter conversation demonstrates: I also have a Visa debit card registered with Apple Pay, so I will try it out as well, but based on Richard’s comment, it doesn’t look like it’s a card type-specific issue at the moment… I love the idea of Apple Pay and easy payments by mobile phone. And I know that people like Jeremy and Richard are just as passionate about payments as I am, so we will continue to persevere and keep trying. But what will a “normal” consumer do if they have a bad experience? Will they be excited enough to come back and try again or will they just give up on mobile payments before they had a chance to succeed? I hope they don’t, but these early Apple Pay glitches clearly show how difficult it is to create a truly great customer experience in payments, especially at the POS.

We Now Accept Nominations for Model Bank Awards 2016

We Now Accept Nominations for Model Bank Awards 2016
I am delighted to announce that we now accept nominations for Model Bank 2016. Most regular readers of our blog will be familiar with the Model Bank programme – it recognizes effective use of technology in banking and is now in its ninth year. Model Bank is the most prestigious award a financial institution can receive from Celent. We celebrate the winners and their initiatives at Insight and Innovation Day (I&I), our flagship event. This year we decided to publish a complimentary report, Becoming a Celent Model Bank: A Guide to Winning Celent’s Main Award for Financial Institutions. Why did we do this? A number of reasons:
  • Model Bank has become a truly global programme. We want to introduce the concept of Model Bank to financial institutions that may not be familiar with it and hope this report will help increase awareness.
  • There are some changes to the Model Bank process in 2016. We felt it was important to explain these changes to institutions that have a history with Celent Model Bank.
  • As the number of submissions grows, the quality inevitably becomes more variable. We want to offer tips on how to win a Model Bank award. We provide transparency into what Celent is looking for when judging the nominations. We also look back and consider lessons from the past.
This year we accept nominations in seven categories:
  1. Omnichannel Banking.
  2. Digital Banking Transformation.
  3. Digital Payments and Cards.
  4. Corporate Payments and Infrastructure Modernisation.
  5. Cash Management and Trade Finance.
  6. Security, Fraud and Risk Management.
  7. Legacy Transformation.
You can find the submission form here; the deadline to submit your nominations is November 20, 2015. We will inform the winners in February 2016 and will invite them to the I&I Day in New York in April. We know that so many of you are proud of what you’ve achieved in your organization or, if you are a vendor, what you helped your clients achieve. Tell us your story – we are keen to hear from you! Good luck!

Why I won’t be using Apple Pay during rush hour on London transport

Why I won’t be using Apple Pay during rush hour on London transport
I am finally a proud user of Apple Pay! It came to the UK on July 14th while I was away on holiday, but I managed to set up my first card even while I was abroad. And I was very proud and pleased when I got back and completed my first Apple Pay transaction. My experience has been more or less as expected. I got an email from American Express announcing that Apple Pay is available and suggesting that I should add my card to it. I have been using my Amex for iTunes, so adding it to Apple Pay was relatively straightforward. Somewhat unexpectedly, I now also get notifications on the phone for all transactions, including those made with a card – I would have thought Passbook would only have my Apple Pay transactions, but I guess it does make more sense to see all transactions on the card in the same place. I also added a debit card issued by my bank. The bank also promoted Apple Pay to me, and when I logged into my mobile banking app, Apple Pay was featured prominently at the top of the “home screen.” Clicking on the banner took me to the screen within the bank app which explained about Apple Pay and had an “Add Card” button. Given that I was already inside the bank’s app having authenticated myself via TouchID, I was expecting that this button would give me a list of the bank issued cards I have and I could add any of them to Apple Pay by just clicking on it. Somewhat disappointingly, I was taken out of the bank’s environment into the regular Apple Pay “add card” process and had to scan my card, wait for the text message with a security code to arrive, and set it up just like I would have done with any other card. I can imagine that what I wanted is perhaps challenging technically, but it still seemed like an opportunity missed to “surprise and delight” me as a customer. When everything works as expected, the transaction experience is brilliant. However, I already expressed my concerns about the reliability of TouchID on these pages before, and they proved to be true – TouchID does not always work for me when trying to use Apple Pay. While this is not much of an issue in a retail setting, it is not something you want when fighting the crowds to get on a tube or train platform during rush hour in London. As Transport for London confirmed in response to a number of complaints about over-charging, you have to touch in and out with the same device throughout the day to ensure the correct fare is charged; touching in with Apple Pay and out with a card or Apple Watch might result in being charged twice, even though all payments might eventually come out from the same card. The other thing is that Apple Pay quickly conditions you to getting transactions confirmed on the phone. Because TfL has daily and weekly caps, it cannot confirm each transaction instantly. Instead, I was charged 10p when I touched in with Apple Pay, with the balance for the day’s travel being charged to my card much later. While this is understandable and a minor gripe, it still contrasts with the experience of other transactions. None of this is TfL’s fault, which deserves plaudits for continuing to improve and give options to how we pay for travel. However, while I will definitely continue to use Apple Pay at the retailers, I am going to stick with a tried and tested Oyster card or a bank contactless card when travelling in London. It is simply not worth fretting every time I approach the gates whether the technology will work at the speed needed to keep the crowds flowing.

Don’t be surprised if your bank knows not just who but also what you are in the future

Don’t be surprised if your bank knows not just who but also what you are in the future
We all know personality tests can be a little hit and miss – some are serious, long and can be scarily accurate. Others you do for fun on a Saturday afternoon whilst reading a magazine, and you never take the results too seriously. I just came across a new type of personality test, Personality Insights powered by IBM’s Watson. According to the description, the test “uses linguistic analytics to extract a spectrum of cognitive and social characteristics from the text data that a person generates through blogs, tweets, forum posts, and more.” Interestingly, it claims to be able to reach conclusions just from a text of 100 words. I was curious to see what the tool would say about me based on some of my blogs. I entered one of the recent texts and I got this back:
You are inner-directed and skeptical. You are empathetic: you feel what others feel and are compassionate towards them. You are philosophical: you are open to and intrigued by new ideas and love to explore them. And you are independent: you have a strong desire to have time to yourself. You are motivated to seek out experiences that provide a strong feeling of connectedness. You are relatively unconcerned with taking pleasure in life: you prefer activities with a purpose greater than just personal enjoyment. You consider achieving success to guide a large part of what you do: you seek out opportunities to improve yourself and demonstrate that you are a capable person.
As always with these things, you never entirely agree, but I could recognise some of my personality there, so I was intrigued. I wanted to try it more and started entering other blogs written by me and my colleagues on this site. Most of the results turned out to be remarkably similar, suggesting that we are “shrewd, skeptical, imaginative, philosophical, driven by a desire for prestige, relatively unconcerned with tradition, etc.” Well, it is possible that we are a fairly homogeneous bunch – as analysts we often talk about new technologies, so we are “relatively unconcerned with tradition”, yet we can’t afford to succumb to the latest hype, so can come across as “skeptical.” But the homogeneity of results made me rather suspicious, so “for something completely different”, I entered an article on English football by a broadsheet journalist. While his profile turned out to be a bit more different, he was also “inner-directed, skeptical, empathetic, and philosophical.” Not surprisingly, I wasn’t the first person to try out the tool with the extremes. A Mashable article described someone submitting “a 1919 letter from Hitler explaining his anti-Semitic agenda to a well-wisher” for analysis. Apparently, Hitler was also “shrewd, skeptical, imaginative, philosophical, laid back, appreciating a relaxed pace in life” and someone who thinks “it is important to take care of people around you.” Now, it’s easy to show how something new is not yet perfect, but there is serious science behind the service. And even though this particular tool still needs to learn and improve, we are convinced that artificial intelligence and Watson-type technologies will have a big impact on customer servicing in Banking and other industries. Implementing and making use of these technologies is not easy, but there is no doubt that in the future more decisions will be driven by data and analytics. So, don’t be surprised if the next time you call up your bank to discuss the latest transactions or the new product you want to buy, you realise they know instantly not just who you are (e.g. via voice biometrics), but also what you are. P.S. I just did sort of a “meta-test” by entering the above text into the service. The tool called me “unconventional” and suggested that I am “intermittent” and “have a hard time sticking with difficult tasks for a long period of time.” Is it not just smart, but potentially vindictive as well? 🙂