Blockchain: Beware the Hype

At Celent, we just published a new research report with the same title as this blog – Blockchain: Beware the Hype. Why such a title? Isn't blockchain the coolest technology out there at the moment?

It is. At Celent, we firmly believe that blockchains and other shared ledger platforms will be a powerful catalyst for change in financial services and other industries for many years to come. There are some very promising use cases, particularly in cross-border payments, corporate banking, and capital markets, and even outside of financial services, in identity management, trade logistics, healthcare, and many other sectors. Even if “blockchain” ends up being a small component of the ultimate solutions, it facilitates new thinking that forces organisations to reimagine how they work, both internally and externally. And that can only be a good thing.

However, we do caution against succumbing to the hype, which is inevitable for any new exciting technologies. Blockchain hype is particularly acute, given the complexities of the underlying technologies. Nobody wants to be left behind when proclaiming the benefits of blockchain, but not everybody truly understands how those benefits can be achieved.

Luckily, the investment going into shared ledger technologies is resulting in a growing number of individuals and organisations lending their collective resources to explore deeply how financial services can benefit from these technologies. Their efforts are directed at exploring practical use cases (e.g. Everledger, Ripple, Shocard), developing new technology and tools (e.g. Ethereum, Intel, Multichain) and building out infrastructure for blockchain initiatives (e.g. IBM, Microsoft), with a number of firms engaged across the board. And the collaborative efforts such as the Hyperledger project or R3 are also bearing fruit – for example, R3 recently announced Corda, a new distributed ledger platform specifically designed for financial services.

We do think that is the way forward: thinking carefully about suitability of technology for the business problem at hand, and deconstructing blockchain technology to its fundamental components only to assemble the most attractive features in a way that makes sense for financial services. That is what will ultimately help us all move beyond the hype.

Celent research clients can access the full report here.

Security, fraud, and risk Model Bank profiles: Alfa Bank and USAA

Banks have worked hard to manage the different risks across their institutions. It has been and will remain costly, time consuming and a top priority. Celent profiles two award-winning banks who have modelled excellence in their use of risk management technologies across their banks.

They demonstrated:

  1. Degree of innovation
  2. Degree of difficulty
  3. Measurable, quantitative business results achieved
(Left to right, Martin Pilecky, CIO Alfa-Bank; Gary McAlum, SVP Enterprise Security Group USAA; Joan McGowan, Senior Analyst Celent)

(Left to right, Martin Pilecky, CIO Alfa-Bank; Gary McAlum, SVP Enterprise Security Group USAA; Joan McGowan, Senior Analyst Celent)

ALFA-BANK: SETS THE STANDARDS FOR BASEL COMPLIANCE IN RUSSIA

Alfa-Bank built a centralized and robust credit risk platform to implement Basel II and III standards, simultaneously, under very tight local regulatory deadlines. The bank decided to centralize all corporate credit-risk information onto a single platform that connected to front office systems and processes. Using Misys FusionRisk, Alfa-Bank was able to implement a central default system with a risk rating and risk-weighted asset calculations engine. The initiative is seen as one of the most important initiatives in the bank’s history. The successful completion of the project has placed Alfa-Bank at the forefront for setting standards and best practice methodologies for capital management regulations for the Russian banking industry and Central Bank.

USAA: SECURITY SELFIE, NATIVE FINGERPRINT, AND VOICE SIGNATURE

The game-changer for USAA is to deliver flawless, contextual customer application services that are secured through less intrusive authentication options. The use of biometrics (fingerprint, facial and vocal) to access its mobile banking application positions USAA to be able to compete with Fintechs across the digital banking ecosystem and offer exceptional service to its military and family members.

USAA worked with Daon Inc. to provide biometric solutions paired with its “Quick Logon” dynamic security token technology, which is embedded in the USAA Mobile App for trusted mobile devices. Biometric and token validation focus on who the user is and who the verifiers are and it addresses increasing concerns around the high level of compromise of static user names, passwords, and predictable security questions from sophisticated phishing attacks, external data breaches, and off-the-shelf credential-stealing malware.

For more information on these initiatives, please see the case study abstract on our website.     

The diversity of payments in the US

As a payments geek, I am always curious about payment experiences in various parts of the world. In the last month I had a couple of trips to the US – to New York and to New Orleans – and they just reminded me how diverse the US payments environment is. And I am only talking about the physical POS; I haven't really ordered anything online or in-app while I was there.

First, a few observations around EMV. As I live in the UK, all my cards are Chip and PIN, and the US market has been migrating to EMV for a while now. Of course, the migration can't happen overnight – some merchants have already upgraded their terminals, but many haven't yet. Also, there is no mandate in the US to use offline PIN, so "chip and signature" EMV cards are common amongst the US issuers. As an end-user, I experienced a full gamut of payment scenarios:

  • Majority of merchants would simply take my card, swipe it and give it back to me straight away. Not one of them checked if my card is even signed, let alone if the signatures matched…
  • On a few occassions, I was asked to insert the card into an EMV terminal and enter my PIN. And then we waited. And waited more. And a bit more. I knew EMV transactions take longer in the US, but I didn't realise just how much longer… Not surprisingly, the networks had to do something about it and have announced software updates (e.g. Visa's Quick Chip for EMV and MasterCard's M/Chip Fast) to speed up transaction processing.
  • Not a single eating establishment I visited had a handheld EMV terminal. All of them just took my card and disappeared for a while in the "back of the room" – a practice that sends shivers down the spine for most Europeans 🙂
  • On at least one occassion, I entered the PIN, yet the salesperson was still looking for a signature box on the receipt and wanted me to sign it. I had to explain that PIN replaces the need for signature; of course, these things will disappear once merchants learn more about the EMV cards.

A number of merchants in New Orleans had a Clover POS station. It looked really sleek on retailer desks and transactions seemed fast and easy. I asked a couple of them what they thought of it, and they all said they were very happy with the device, its looks and ease of use.

As a side note, American Express cards seem to be far more widely accepted in the US. In Europe, I got into a habit to double check at new places if they take Amex; in the US, that seems unnecessary.

Of course, it's no longer just cards. US was the first market in the world to see the launch of Apple Pay, Android Pay and a number of other digital wallets. The challenge for many of these wallets is the lack of places where they can be used, as contactless terminals remain relatively rare, albeit growing. However, when they can be used, they work very well. The biggest advantage that I can see as the UK user of Apple Pay is that in the US I can use Apple Pay for any transaction, whatever the amount (as long as my issuer is happy to authorise it). I had no problem paying for a taxi ride from New York's JFK airport to downtown by Apple Pay ($70+ fare with the tip). In the UK, Apple Pay and Android Pay (which has just launched this week) are subject to the same contactless card transaction limits and can only be used for transactions of £30 or less. Again, we expect this to change, as contactless terminals get upgraded.

I was also intrigued to see a PayPal acceptance badge at one of the POS terminals. I asked the cashier if it was a popular payment method amongst their customers. The cashier said that it seemed new to him, and that he personally had yet to see anyone trying to use it. I must admit, I am a fan of the PayPal wallet and use it whenever I can, but nearly all of my transactions are online/ via a mobile app. This time, I only noticed the PayPal sign after I already started paying by card, so can't quite report on the actual experience…

And yet, cash remains hard to beat, with many places only accepting cash. I refrained from visiting any of the dodgier establishments on New Orleans' Bourbon Street, but I didn't even had to in order to experience the power of cash. Most sellers in the French Market clearly prefer cash; getting into (jazz) Preservation Hall is "cash only" at the door, and while not every place has the sign as artistic as the one in the picture below, "cash only, one drink minimum" was a common mantra of many bars with live music.

cash only

Clearly, there is a lot of payments innovation in the US. Various wallets and innovations in POS contribute to the diversity of end user experiences. Such diversity is a good thing and if anything, it will only increase, as customers will have increasingly more ways to pay. And as the migration to EMV continues, the undesireable kind of diversity should reduce as well.

Citi’s geolocation move

American Banker just ran an interesting article about Citi’s foray into the use of geolocation (beacons) as it pilots several use cases in its “smart branches.” Several thoughts immediately came to mind as I read Tanaya Macheel’s well-written article:

  • The use of beacons for cardless access to branch ATMs after business hours was the lead use case cited in the article. But, that’s just one of a growing number of potentially very useful applications for beacons in retail financial services.
  • Banks have barely scratched the surface in more usefully integrating digital and physical channels as they seek to maximize customer engagement.
  • Geolocation, in particular, is under-utilized by retailers (especially banks) and remains largely experimental.

My hat is off to Citi for its purposeful investment in developing expertise in this area and to American Banker for writing about Citi’s work. In my view, the most impressive aspect of this initiative isn’t so much Citi’s pushing the technology envelope; it’s the organizational effort that was likely required. Getting its branch operations, mobile product management, IT and LOB leadership aligned represents real commitment to innovation.

How far ahead of the industry is Citi?

Here’s one data point. In Celent’s inaugural Branch Transformation Research Panel survey in (June 2015), we sought to establish a benchmark on just how far and how fast NA institutions were pursuing branch channel transformation. Of course, several questions addressed planned technology usage. Out of a dozen examples of technology usage, geo-location ranked dead last in terms of the liklihood of usage in future branch designs – just 27% of surveyed institutions thought the use of beacons would be "somewhat likely" or "very likely".

Branch Tech Usage

Pretty far I'd say!

Why are credit unions changing vendors at a higher rate than banks?

Credit unions are almost twice as likely to change vendors as banks, with competitive churn rates of 7.6% compared to 2.7% for banks.  Churn Rate measures the number of institutions in a given time period that either change or drop a vendor contract.  Churn is broken down into two components: competitive churn, which measures the rate at which institutions are opting to change vendors, and consolidation churn, which measures uncontrollable factors like acquisitions or liquidations. The figure below (powered using data from FI Navigator) references total churn for the year ending March 31st, 2016.

FINPic

The figure reveals significant differences in churn between banks and credit unions.  But why is this difference so large? There are two possible drivers:

  1. Customer centricity: A focus on the customer could be a driver for higher churn. Banks and credit unions operate differently, and Celent has explored the variations in blogs and publications.  The mission statement of the credit union market has historically revolved around extreme customer centricity.  Over the last decade, mobile has become a critical component in quality customer service.  Emphasizing the needs of the customer could be driving credit unions to take more concerted efforts to maximize mobile/ digital, exploring competitive options more frequently than banks. Credit unions are low margin businesses that often give higher interest rates for products like auto-loans or deposit accounts through non-profit tax breaks.  Being member-owned, most of the smaller profits also go back into the business.  This creates a natural incentive to streamline the back-office, and credit unions have adopted cost effective technologies at higher rates. Thin margins combined with a focus on customer service could mean credit unions are more likely to evaluate provider options more frequently.
  2. Solution providers: Another perspective is that it’s the vendor market, not the CUs that are driving the churn. The vendor spectrum for credit unions in the US is much more diverse, with 43 vendors compared to 22 selling to banks.   This would reinforce the argument that competitive dynamics are more intense, and it would be reflected in sales cycles. With cost pressures that originate from their smaller size and lower margins, credit unions are more likely to look for alternative ways to provide products and services, leveraging mechanisms like Credit Union Service Organizations (CUSOs) to enhance the business.  Other similar joint ventures leverage cooperative arrangements to develop homegrown software products.  Consortiums not present in the banking market would introduce more competitors into the market, and as a result impact competitive dynamics.

Credit unions skew much smaller than banks (the mean credit union asset size is  $200 million vs. banks with around $2.5 billion), leading to a noticeably higher consolidated churn. Celent examined the pressures on credit unions here. As minimum viable institution size continues to get bigger, smaller institutions will be challenged to stay afloat. Vendors will face the risk that their customers are becoming targets for M&A activity resulting in more vendors competing for a shrinking demographic.

Credit unions need to think about how to best streamline their operations to remain viable.  This includes a mix of cost-effective customer service technologies like mobile banking.  Vendors need to have a better understanding of the competitive landscape into which they sell, as competition is intense.  Better data and detailed benchmarks can help vendors plan their strategy.

Celent is collaborating with FI Navigator to analyze the mobile banking market in financial services (in fact, FI Navigator wrote a great piece about credit unions and banks last year).  FI Navigator assembled a platform that leverages a proprietary algorithm to track every financial institution offering mobile in the US, as well as nearly 50 vendors.  Beginning with the first report at the end of April, Celent will be releasing a biannual examination of the mobile market. FI Navigator will also be making the platform available for further custom reporting and data analysis.  For more information on the nature of the collaboration and availability of data, go here.

Digital banking is ready to take off in Latin America

Digital is the new reality in Latin America. In a recent Celent survey 100% of the participants recognized that a scenario where all financial products get digitized needs to be addressed sometime in the next 7 years and 59% of them believe it needs to be addressed immediately. There is also a general consensus that most banks are entering into Digital late, despite some are already moving in that direction. Threat of fintechs is also a reality. Over 80 fintechs in Brazil and 60 in Colombia are a good sense that the industry is already being challenged beyond incumbents.

In other geographies Banks have responded to this threat by becoming extremely digital and also neo-banks have been launched to attract those customers seeking for a more friendly and digital relationship with its financial institution. Atom Bank in the UK, Fidor Bank in Germany, and mBank in Poland are only a few to mention. In Latin America the major milestones in Digital development we had seen were Nubank (Brazil – Market Cap $500M) and Bankaool (Mexico – ~$142M in assets), until March of 2016 when Banco Original (~$1,67Bn in assets) launched in Brazil.

While Nubank is focused entirely in offering a credit card with a customer friendly personalized real-time view of expenses and modern contact channels (email, call or chat), Bankaool is mainly focused in a checking account with a debit card, SME loans and investment vehicles.

Banco Original is the 3rd step in this digital only bank strategy in the region, becoming the 1st universal digital only bank in Latin America.  As part of its strategy to position the bank as different and innovative they launched this advertising campaign featuring Usain Bolt. As part of a strategic definition in 2013 the bank started a ~$152M investment over the period of 3 years to become a digital bank. They launched in March of this year . The bank has no branches and the interaction is 100% through digital channels and a call center. This move was central to its strategy of becoming a universal bank moving away of being solely focused in agribusiness.

While most of neo-banks and fintechs looking to change the customer experience in financial services have adopted in-house development to support their digital strategy, this is not the case of Banco Original which relied in a 3rd party Open API solution. Commercially available solutions that can support a digital only bank means that as an industry we are ready to take off. There is no reason now why other banks should not follow, and software vendors will do their part pushing their offering into banks of all sizes.

I believe that we are in a tipping point were banks in Latin America will need to re-think their investments and strategies towards digital: the threat is now real.

Two upcoming reports will be covering Digital and a couple of disruptive scenarios in the banking industry in Latin America, so expect to have more information soon if you are a Celent customer. If you would like to become a Celent customer please contact Fabio Sarrico (fsarrico@celent.com).

 

I hate being wrong: A precise look at mRDC adoption in the US

Nobody likes being wrong. I’m no exception.

Sometimes it’s not so much being wrong as much as being inaccurate. Here’s an example of where my best-effort estimates have been a bit off.

Mobile RDC (mRDC) has been a fairly hot topic and a mobile banking capability that has gained rapid and widespread adoption among US banks. But how rapid and how widespread? I’ve taken a stab at answering these and other questions over the past few years. Relying on a combination of financial institution surveys and RFI responses from the leading vendors, Celent has published comprehensive annual reports on the evolving state of remote deposit capture, including mRDC.

Back to the question…

Since empirical methods would be tedious and time consuming, I created estimates of mRDC bank adoption annually based on vendor-reported client base and implementation backlogs. It turns out that two of my last three annual estimates weren’t all that accurate. How do I know?

Last month, FI Navigator and Celent announced a collaboration to publish the industry’s most comprehensive report detailing mobile banking offerings on the more than 6,000 U.S. financial institutions that offer mobile banking and more than 50 vendor providers.

The report, Mobile Banking Quantified – Comprehensive Benchmarks for US Vendors & Institutions, will be available for download in late April 2016. The research leverages FI Navigator’s mobile banking data and analytics module, along with Celent’s industry research methodologies, to provide vendor and institution performance standards from nearly three years of month-to-month historical data.

Look at how my historical annual estimates compare to the more accurate FI Navigator data since mid-2013.

mRDC History

Back in 2013, vendors were implementing as quickly as they could. In aggregate, vendors reported over 700 banks and credit unions were under contract, but not implemented. It turns out that implementations proceeded faster than I thought, as my year-end estimate was 40% low! I did better in 2014, but estimated 9% high in 2015.

I look forward to the extraordinary precision and depth of insight Celent’s relationship with FI Navigator will bring the industry. For more information on the report and additional offerings, please go to http://discover.celent.com/FIN-Mobile.

Congratulations to Celent Model Bank 2016 Winners!

Last week many of us at Celent were in New York attending our Innovation and Insight Day on April 13th. It is Celent's flagship event during which we announce Model Bank and Model Insurer winners and celebrate their achievements. In addition, the program includes keynote speeches from industry leaders and Celent analysts, plenty of opportunities to network with peers, and even to experience some of the latest technologies first hand, courtesy of our sponsors.

The theme of this year's event was "Financial Services Reborn", and the Museum of American Finance on Wall Street provided an inspiring setting to celebrate innovation in financial services. Craig Weber, Celent CEO, kicked off the proceedings drawing insightful parallels between the battle of Alamo and the future of financial services. It must have been the first time in Craig's career that he had to come up on stage to the soundtrack of hip hop music, an extract from the Broadway musical "Hamilton", but it set the tone for the rest of the day – to expect the unexpected and to be open to new ideas.

Both of our guest speakers – Nadeem Shaikh, Co-Founder and CEO of Anthemis Group, and Leanne Kemp, Founder and CEO of Everledger – thrilled the audience and opened everyone's eyes to the opportunities presented by Fintech and Blockchain respectively, while our colleague Will Trout spoke eloquently about consumer-led convergence. A big 'thank you' to all the speakers, as well as the sponsors supporting the event!

The rest of the day was all about celebrating the achievements of Model Bank and Model Insurance award winners. As many of this blog's readers know, the vision for Celent’s Model Bank research, now in its ninth year, is to spotlight effective uses of technology in banking. This year we received a record number of submissions – well over 100 – that came from all over the world; the nominations were spread equally between North America, EMEA and APAC. The award winners come from four continents and nine countries and range from credit unions and microfinance institutions to the world's largest banks.

Celent Model Bank 2016 winners are:

  Model Bank 2016 Categories

  Award Winners

  1. Digital Banking Transformation

  Citizens Bank, US

  DenizBank, Turkey

  Garanti Bank, Turkey

  Santander, US

  2. Omnichannel Banking

  BECU, US

  Beyond Bank, Australia

  Standard Chartered Bank, Korea

  3. Digital Payments and Cards

  Bank of America Merrill Lynch, US

  RBC, Canada

  4. Corporate Payments and Infrastructure Modernization

  Bank of China, China

  CBW Bank, US

  5. Cash Management and Trade Finance

  CIBC, Canada

  HBL (Habib Bank), Pakistan

  6. Security, Fraud, and Risk Management

  Alfa-Bank, Russia

  USAA, US

  7. Legacy Transformation

  Sberbank, Russia

  Umpqua Bank, US

  Vietnam Bank For Social Policies, Vietnam

  Model Bank of the Year

  Eastern Bank, US

As always, we published a series of reports with detailed case studies of all winning initiatives. Celent research subscription clients can access the Model Bank of the Year and individual category reports via our website.

This year we also introduced a new award, Model Bank Vendor. We wanted to acknowledge the vendor role in helping multiple clients achieve technology or implementation excellence, one of our judging criteria, and to extend our appreciation to the entire vendor community, which is instrumental in the ongoing success of the Model Bank program. Celent recognized two companies as Model Bank Vendors for 2016:

  • EdgeVerve Systems
  • Nucleus Software

Congratulations to all our award winners! We are grateful to have been exposed to so many extraordinary initiatives and the talented individuals responsible for their success. We look forward to continuing with the Model Bank program next year to identify and award the most impressive banking technology initiatives from around the world, and will begin accepting nominations again in September – stay tuned!

 

A good recipe from the Brazilian banking industry in times of need

The world seems convulsed these days. No matter where you live, something significant is developing around you or about to burst.

Brazil has not been the exception. Economic slowdown and corruption allegations involving high officers in government and the private sector, have led to massive social protests. The Panama Papers only to continue to build a lack of trust on things changing easily. But Brazil is a huge economy, with very talented people and industries that can compete at world-class level. Some things need to change for sure; with a trusted leadership is just a matter of time for Brazil to come back to the right path.

On a positive note from the financial sector, early this year FEBRABAN, the Brazilian banking industry’s main federation, and Brazil’s top five banks entered into a memorandum of understanding with LexisNexis®Risk Solutions by which the latter will provide technical services for a new credit intelligence bureau that will modernize the current Brazilian credit risk information ecosystem.

The effort has the objective of financially including more Brazilians in the long run and efficiently assessing consumer credit risk, with the potential to "change lives, generate sustainable economic expansion in a world-class economy, all the while providing financial institutions with the tools to assess and manage risk more effectively" as indicated in LexisNexis®Risk Solutoins press release. It will make possible for the credit intelligence bureau to process and analyze complex, massive data sets in a matter of seconds. It is expected that the ability to process quickly large volumes of transaction data will help the credit intelligence bureau to effectively manage financial payment experiences, resulting in a bureau with a sophisticated infrastructure.

This decision by FEBRABAN, Bradesco, Banco do Brasil, Caixa Econômica Federal, Itaú Unibanco and Santander comes very handy in order to offset the effects of the country's economic moment by expanding the potential market and providing financial solutions to people that are seeing its purchasing power affected. Banks are not alone in coming up with positive initiatives as insurers have also made moves along these lines.

It’s good to see that, from the banking perspective, Brazil does not stay arms crossed waiting to see what happens; instead they are trying a good recipe to be applied in times of need: Seeking efficiency and growth, by financially including more people into the system through a more effective risk assessment.

 

Getting to digital while missing the point

Digital banking is so hot right now – for good reason. The recently published research sponsored by the Federal Reserve, Consumers and Mobile Financial Services 2016, reported that 87% of the U.S. adult population has a mobile phone and 77% of them are smartphones, up from 71% in 2014 and 61% in 2013. Admittedly, it is getting hard to find a phone that’s not internet-enabled. But consumers are acquiring them for a reason – and it’s not telephony. The same report documented the rise of mobile banking: 43% of all mobile phone owners with a bank account had used mobile banking in the past 12 months, up from 39% in 2014 and 33% in 2013.

Digital Banking Not surprisingly then, the significant majority of US financial institutions now offer digital banking capabilities to their customers. But, most were designed to migrate transactions away from the more expensive branch channel to lower-cost self-service mechanisms. A worthy objective, but it misses the point (more on that later).

Celent has research in the field now designed to understand just how far US banks and credit unions have come in achieving digital channel adoption targets. The short (however preliminary) answer: not very far. It’s not for lack of trying, however. Two-thirds of responding institutions said they have specific, measurable digital channel adoption goals.

Digital adoption goals Mar 16
Source: Celent Managed Research Panel, March 2015, n=32

Beyond Transactions More recently, a growing number of banks and credit unions are thinking beyond transactions toward digital sales and service. Another worthy objective, particularly among the large number of institutions that are, frankly, desperate for revenue growth. A minority have specific , measurable goals to increase digital customer acquisition. We expect that to change as more banks embrace the imperative for omnichannel delivery. Institutions thinking beyond transactions are paying close attention to the state of digital customer acquisition – for good reason. About three-quarters of banks in Celent’s survey track completion rates, but far fewer systematically follow up on incomplete applications. This is a problem! The apparent disconnect seems to reflect a bias towards digital delivery. If cost reduction is the primary objective (it rarely is) than good. But if revenue growth and customer engagement are what banks are after (I believe that to be the case) then many are missing the point.

In my opinion, the objective of omnichannel banking shouldn’t be tied to migrating an arbitrary percentage of customer interactions to the digital realm – whether transactions or sales. Consumers are becoming increasingly digitally-driven without bank’s involvement! The point of omnichannel delivery is to offer customers consistent and convenient ways to engage with your bank whenever and wherever they so choose, not to achieve some arbitrary channel mix.

The fact is, most consumers don’t want to open accounts on their mobile devices, even though they are very likely to be researching banking products and services online. That’s why banks need to offer a variety of low-friction ways to engage with customers and prospects. Click-to-call and digital appointment booking are two examples. Digital appointment booking (DAB), in particular, has emerged as “low-hanging fruit” among banks seeking to better integrate digital and in-person engagement. Although impressive results can be obtained from relatively modest effort, few institutions have taken this step.

Digital Appointment Booking First and foremost, DAB is not about driving branch traffic or somehow prolonging its relevance as some have suggested. Rather, DAB is about improving omnichannel customer engagement. Best practices suggest it is not a silver bullet either, but one of many customer engagement mechanisms that leading financial institutions are learning how to orchestrate to better serve customers. DAB is also not simply about booking appointments. When integrated with lobby management systems, DAB solutions help customers efficiently and effectively accomplish what they want and when they want it. Done well, DAB is very much a win-win. This is the point, isn’t it?

I’ll be presenting on best practices in digital appointment booking at American Banker’s Retail Banking 2016 in Las Vegas on Wednesday afternoon April 6th. The presentation is part of Innovations for Credit Unions from 1:00 – 4:00 in the afternoon. If you’re planning to attend, feel free to stop by and say “hello”!