Emerging Innovation in Banking

Emerging Innovation in Banking

Over the past few weeks we have been previewing various content themes we will be discussing at our Insight and Innovation Day in Boston on April 4th. I would like to finish this series of posts by looking at the new Model Bank category we introduced this year – Emerging Innovation.

When we added this category, we weren’t quite sure what to expect, but we certainly hoped to see the banks’ efforts at the “bleeding edge” of innovation. We were very pleased with the number and quality of such nominations, which spanned the gamut of the hottest topics today. Many of these truly outstanding stories are still in relatively early stages, but all are very interesting and pointing to the future of banking.

Model Bank nominations in 2017 showcased the banks’ efforts in the areas at the forefront of innovation in banking:

  • Innovative customer engagement: the most innovative banks go where their customers are; for example, banks are experimenting with ways to engage their customers directly from social media platforms via chatbots and other tools. They are also looking to introduce new channels, such as wearables.
  • Artificial intelligence (AI): Model Bank submissions demonstrated the diversity of AI technologies and their applications:
    • Driving a virtual agent capable to have a written exchange with the customer via a chatbot, or to even hold a verbal conversation on the phone.
    • Powering a robot to support customer engagement in physical branches.
    • Deployed behind the scenes as a tool to help the customer service agents.
    • Helping determine the best marketing offer for the customer.
  • Biometrics: banks are stepping up their efforts to deploy biometric authentication in their bid to provide customers more convenience while ensuring security. They are expanding beyond fingerprints and are experimenting with other modalities such as facial and voice biometrics. And it’s also not just for consumers – banks are beginning to use biometrics in the corporate banking context as well.
  • APIs: we already spoke about APIs when describing Open Banking, but want to highlight this again, given the importance of APIs. While banks in Europe must open up because of regulation, leading banks around the world are not waiting for the regulators and are starting to provide API-based access to their services to others. And some banks are pursuing a “marketplace banking” strategy seeking to position themselves as a banking platform in the centre on which third parties can build a myriad of discrete services. 
  • Blockchain: given how many banks have started exploring blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies, we were hoping to see some nominations describing their efforts in this space. We were not disappointed and received initiatives ranging from collaborative efforts around cross-border payments and trade finance to “solo” efforts of a single bank using blockchain to manage employee incentives.

We will be discussing all these topics and more at our Insight and Innovation Day next week. It is also the time when we announce and award all the Model Bank winners, including our Model Bank of the Year. We are in the final stages of preparation and are very excited! The event has been sold out for weeks, so if you haven't yet registered you might be too late… If you have registered, we are looking forward to welcoming you there, although if your plans have changed, please let us know so that we could invite those on the waiting list. See you in Boston!

Model Bank 2017: Small Business and Corporate Digital Innovation Themes

Model Bank 2017: Small Business and Corporate Digital Innovation Themes

This is the fifth article in a weekly series highlighting trends and themes from Celent’s Model Bank submission process. For more information on how the Model Bank Awards have evolved, see the first two pieces from Dan Latimore and Zil Bareisis. This particular article is focused on innovations in small business and corporate banking:  two critical market segments for financial institutions as they seek revenue growth and relevance in the evolving digital B2B marketplace. 

When evaluating this year’s Model Bank submissions that are targeted at small business and corporate clients, we identified a number of excellent initiatives in each of the five overall categories:

    Customer Experience

    Products

    Operations and Risk

    Legacy Transformation / IT Platform Innovations

    Emerging Innovation

For these two segments, the Model Bank award candidates come from Europe, North America, the Caribbean, Asia Pacific and the Middle East. Despite the wide geographic spread of the submissions we received, certain common themes became evident that are important to highlight, 

Enhancing client experience is paramount: Banks are intensely focused on how to deliver solutions to clients in ways that are convenient and easy to use in order to meet the emerging expectations of business users based on their consumer experiences with technology. Creating a consolidated point of access for all corporate banking services using portal technology that eliminates the need for multiple logins and security procedures was just one of the types of initiatives that were submitted.  Mobile and tablet access are becoming mainstream channels for employees of business and corporate clients to effectively manage their daily workload no matter where they might be located.

Improving digital channels is not enough to succeed: The initiatives that demonstrate significant quantifiable benefits to banks and clients are those that address the inefficiencies in the way that bank employees interact with their clients but also involve the elimination of paper-intense, manual workflows both for the client and the bank. From the use of videoconferencing technology to access experts in trade finance for advisory services to the replacement of faxed instructions with digitally signed transactions initiated on mobile phones, banks are finding innovative ways to contribute to their own efficiency while also improving client productivity. Another critical element of the digitization of these processes is speed. Automation enables faster decisions (for example for credit approval) and this provides business with a superior service and the ability to manage their businesses rather than managing their banking relationships. These initiatives drive revenue growth and loyalty because the bank’s services provide quantifiable benefits to clients that are seeking to leverage technology advances in order to more effective manage their working capital.

Reinvention in Small Business Banking: I was struck by several of the initiatives that represent an entirely new way of thinking about how to enable entrepreneurs and small business owners to succeed. Rather than tweaking traditional banking solutions that are designed for consumers or larger businesses, several of the banks submitted initiatives that reflect an entirely different way of meeting the needs of small business clients. Recognizing that the needs of entrepreneurs and start-ups fall well beyond the services that a bank traditionally offers (i.e. credit, payments, cash management), a few innovative banks have attempted to reinvent business banking by offering a complete, integrated package that combines traditional banking activities with non-banking services that extend beyond even the adjacent types of solutions that banks typically make available through partnerships (e.g. payroll services). The goal of these packages is to offer a business owner every piece of business functionality and technology they would need to grow their business. What makes these solutions especially impactful is that they are designed from a business owner’s perspective and don’t reflect a bank-centric view of how the client should manage their business. 

I hope this brief description whets your appetite for more discussion on our award winners in small business and corporate banking at the 10th annual Innovation and Insight Day on April 4th in Boston. I look forward to seeing you there.

European Payments: Breathing a Sigh of Relief (For Now)

European Payments: Breathing a Sigh of Relief (For Now)

In our recently published report on Top Trends in Retail Payments we quoted a European payments professional:

“If the publication of PSD2 gave the industry a headache, then the publication of draft RTS gave it a heart attack.”

Of course, he was talking about the draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) that the European Banking Authority (EBA) has been tasked to develop for how the industry should implement Payment Serivces Directive's (PSD2) requirements for strong customer authentication and secure communicationThe draft RTS published in a consultation paper last August was indeed rather draconian. One of the key proposals was "not to propose exemptions based on a transaction risk analysis performed by the PSP” and to keep “the authentication procedure […] fully in the sphere of competence of the ASPSP [Account Servicing Payment Service Providers, i.e. banks].” The draft RTS has united the industry to an extent rarely seen before – representatives from payments, cards, e-commerce, small merchants, digital technology, telecoms, travel and industries have expressed concerns that the EBA’s standards implemented in their current form would “make online shopping much more onerous than it is today and have a wider and chilling effect on the Digital Single Market.”

Thankfully, it appears that the EBA has been listening. The final standards have not yet been published, but yesterday, Andrea Enria, Chairperson of the EBA gave a speech at the Westminster Forum, and has given the clearest indication yet that the EBA is open to changing the RTS. Specifically, according to the speech, the RTS when published will:

  • Introduce two new exemptions, one based on "transaction risk analysis" and the other for payments at so-called "unattended terminals" for transport or parking fares. Transaction risk analysis exemption will be linked to maintaining predefined fraud levels and will be reviewed after 18 months.
  • Contain some changes to the existing exemptions, such as increasing from EUR 10 to EUR 30 the threshold for remote payment transactions. However, there will be no further exemptions for e.g. corporate payments.
  • Outlaw the current practice of third party access without identification (e.g. ‘screen scraping’) once the transition period under the PSD2 has elapsed and the RTS applies.
  • Maintain the obligation for the ASPSPs to offer at least one interface for AISPs and PISPs to access payment account information. A requirement has been added requiring banks to provide the same level of availability and performance as the interface offered to, and used by, their own customers, as well as to provide the same level of contingency measures in case of unplanned unavailability.
  • Remove references to ISO 27001 and other specific, technological characteristics, to ensure technology-neutrality and allow for future innovations.

It will be important to review the details when the final RTS is published, and of course, much work will still have to be done by the industry to ensure compliance. Yet, it seems that the payments professionals in Europe may breathe a sign of relief – the heart attack may have just been averted, at least for now.

Rethinking the Customer Experience: Themes from the 2017 Model Bank Submissions

Rethinking the Customer Experience: Themes from the 2017 Model Bank Submissions
This is the third article in a weekly series highlighting trends and themes from Celent’s Model Bank submission process. Dan Latimore and Zil Bareisis led off with two great pieces on the evolution of the Model Bank Awards.  Articles from this week on will explore some of the broader themes within each category. Customer experience initiatives are typically the most numerous.  While this makes the category more difficult to judge, it offers immense insight into what’s happening in the market. The standards of customer engagement are constantly changing, and banks are experimenting with new ways to drive increased satisfaction, higher revenue, and greater loyalty.  Three themes stand out this year. Digital banking subsidiaries: Many banks are finding that existing systems are too rigid to accommodate a truly digital experience.  A number of customer experience submissions this year focus on building out separate digital subsidiary brands within traditional institutions. Banks are typically going in two different directions.  The first is a digital subsidiary as an offshoot of the parent bank.  These brands are basically separate products that offer a digital-first experience to a certain demographic, but are closely tied to the main bank. Brands are similar and products/ services are frequently cross-sold. The second type is a completely separate brand ring-fenced under a different technology stack, operating under the umbrella of the parent organization but effectively a separate entity.  These banks may leverage the parent for product support, but are usually sandboxes for “testing” digital.  Submissions were a mix of the two approaches. Fintech partnerships: The shift from disruptive to collaborative relationships between financial services and Fintech startups feature prominently in this year’s award submissions.   They range from standard B2B vendor relationships to more advanced functional partnerships where portions of the Fintech’s offering is exposed within the traditional institutions digital UI.  Initiatives reflect the growing acceptance among the industry that banks can’t be all things to all people.  Institutions are acknowledging the valuable and complementary role Fintech can play in providing a modern, innovative customer experience. AI and bot technology: Bursting out of the gate in 2015/16, Banks have begun a mad dash towards AI and other bot technologies.  This is a broad spectrum of projects that include everything from simple bots to cognitive computing.  Submissions this year show institutions spreading their resources across many different applications.  Like any emerging technology, most institutions are in a “test and learn” phase.   These technologies are at varying levels of maturity, but the potential to revolutionize the customer experience through AI may be truly transformational, and Celent was pleased to see so many projects in this space. This is just a taste of what we’ll have in store at the 10th annual Innovation and Insight Day on April 4th in Boston. We’ll be diving much deeper into the various topics, revealing the winners of all the awards, and discussing how they combined serious innovation with tangible business benefits to stand out from so many strong contenders. I look forward to seeing you all there.

Fintech’s Beneficiaries: Two Approaches to Regulation

Fintech’s Beneficiaries:  Two Approaches to Regulation
British Prime Minister Theresa May visits the United States this afternoon to address a gathering of Republican lawmakers in Philadelphia, followed by a visit to the White House tomorrow.  Tomorrow’s meeting is noteworthy, as Prime Minister May will be the first foreign leader to meet with President Trump since the latter’s inauguration only last week. The timing is also interesting, as only two weeks ago outgoing President Obama’s National Economic Council (NEC) released a new whitepaper called A Framework for FinTech.  The NEC, a policy advisory unit of the White House established in 1993, proposed 10 high-level principles designed to move the US fintech industry forward. The FinTech whitepaper resulted from the White House’s FinTech Summit in June, 2016 that brought together a wide range of bankers, policy makers, and other interested parties, and subtext of the whitepaper was that cooperation between all stakeholders would yield greater innovation in financial services, as summed up below..
“[A] policy strategy that helps advance fintech and the broader financial services sector, achieve policy objectives where financial services play an integral role, and maintain a robust competitive advantage in the technology and financial services sectors [will]  promote broad-based economic growth at home and abroad.”
Innovation in financial services has been on the agenda of the British government dating back to 2002, when the UK Competition Commission concluded that lowering the barriers to entry in the provision of financial services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) for competitors would improve service and lower prices paid by SMEs.  The 2002 report spurred on additional studies by various UK regulators regarding the impact of industry consolidation in banking on the outcomes for retail and SME customers. Fast-forward to February of 2016, when HM Treasury published a report of the Open Banking Working Group (OBWG) that essentially mandated many of the recommendations made by the 2014 Fingleton Report that talked about use cases and potential benefits of open APIs to drive innovation in banking and expand competition.  A blog entry by my colleague Patty Hines represents an excellent summary of this report. So while both the US and the UK governments promote innovation and growth in  fintech, they come at it at a slightly different angle, as is seen in the August, 2016 follow-on report of the UK’s Competition and Market’s Authority (the successor regulator to the Competition Commission).
“[O]lder and larger banks do not have to compete hard enough for customers’ business, and smaller and newer banks find it difficult to grow. This means that many people are paying more than they should and are not benefiting from new services.”
Even as this statement hints at subtle differences in policy goals, thankfully there’s no need to take one side or the other, as ultimately innovation in financial services can achieve both goals.  Whether creating customer advantage is a stated goal or merely a collateral benefit of fintech, the movement towards opening up the banking system through more accessible APIs will ultimately benefit not only the consumer, but the financial institutions themselves. Clearly, banks need to continually work on sharpening their game in the use of emerging technologies in order to maintain their competitiveness, but for the moment the dance floor remains open for those who choose to embrace innovation rather than fear the change that is to come.

Introducing Celent Model Bank 2017 Awards

Introducing Celent Model Bank 2017 Awards
As my colleague Dan Latimore wrote in the article that began this series, 2017 was the best ever year so far for Celent Model Bank programme in terms of quantity, quality and diversity of nominations. As we went through the judging process, we felt a range of emotions – grateful and privileged to receive so many amazing stories, and daunted by the prospect of having to pick the most worthy award recipients. In the end, we are excited and confident about our selection of winners, yet we are sorry that we could not recognize so many others that clearly also deserve recognition.

Over its ten years of existence, Celent’s Model Bank programme has always changed and evolved. In the last few years we have been awarding multiple initiatives in a small number of categories – for example, last year we had four winners in Digital Banking Transformation, the busiest of seven categories. While all the awards within the category were equal, we knew that some institutions craved for more exclusive recognition. This year, we decided to take it a step further and to introduce specific named awards with only a single winner for each award.

After long deliberations, the judging panel decided to recognise 21 initiatives as winners of the following Model Bank 2017 awards:
  • Consumer Digital Platform – for delivering an outstanding digital experience for consumers. The award is open for traditional financial institutions, digital-first, and challenger banks.
  • Small Business Digital Platform – for delivering an outstanding digital experience for small businesses.
  • Corporate Banking Digital Platform – for delivering an outstanding digital experience for corporate clients.
  • Consumer Banking Channel Innovation – for the most creative use of consumer channels, or the most effective channel integration.
  • Branch Transformation – for the most compelling branch transformation initiative, including branch format innovations and creative use of live agents.
  • Product Innovation – for demonstrating the ability to launch multiple innovative products.
  • Open Banking – for the most impressive API strategy and results so far.
  • Payments Product – for launching the best consumer or business payments product.
  • Lending Product – for the most impressive consumer or business lending or collections initiative.
  • Fraud Management and Cybersecurity – for the most creative and effective approach to fraud management or cybersecurity.
  • Risk Management – for the most impressive initiative to improve enterprise risk management.
  • Process Automation – for the most effective deployment of technology to automate business processes or decision-making.
  • Employee Productivity – for improving employee training or collaboration, incentivising employees, or enabling mobile agents.
  • Payments Replatforming – for the most impressive project to improve payments back office, e.g. payment services hub implementation or cards replatforming.
  • Core Banking Transformation – for the most compelling initiative to transform a traditional core banking platform.
  • Banking in the Cloud – for innovative approaches to implement a banking platform, e.g. deploying in the cloud.
  • Banking as a Platform – for creating an ecosystem of partners via a banking platform that connects and enables third parties.
  • Emerging Technology for Consumers – for creative deployment of emerging technologies for consumers (e.g. AI, ML, API, biometrics, wearables, voice, blockchain, etc.)
  • Emerging Technology for Businesses – for creative deployment of emerging technologies for small business or corporate clients (e.g. AI, ML, API, biometrics, wearables, voice, blockchain, etc.)
  • Most Promising Proof-of-Concept – for the most promising experiment – pilot or proof-of-concept – with emerging technologies.
  • Financial Inclusion – for efforts to bring financial services to unbanked and under-banker communities.
And of course, we also kept our Model Bank of the Year award, first introduced in 2012, which recognises one financial institution that in any given year simply stands out from the crowd and uniformly impresses Celent judges.

For the time being, only the nominees will know if they won any of these awards, as we begin working with them to distill their achievements into a series of case studies. We will be announcing all winners publicly on April 4 at our 2017 Innovation & Insight Day in Boston. In addition to presenting the award trophies to the winners, Celent analysts will be discussing broader trends we’ve seen across all nominations and will share our perspectives why we chose those particular initiatives as winners. Make sure you reserve your slot here while there are still spaces available!

Goodbye PFM, Hello PFE (Personal Financial Experiences)

Goodbye PFM, Hello PFE (Personal Financial Experiences)

Personal Financial Management – PFM – has been a worthy goal pursued by many providers, yet consumers continue to ignore its possibilities. Rather than trying to incrementally expand the share of 10-12% of PFM users, banks should instead focus on the next stage in the evolution of personal finance: Personal Financial Experiences, or PFE.

We’re big fans of PFM (Personal Financial Management)…conceptually. We think that it has the potential to help people better control their finances and live happier, less-stressed lives. And yet, despite numerous efforts over the years, traditional PFM has not gained significant marketplace traction. It’s too cumbersome and inconvenient, while crucially often serving up bad news – and who wants that? At the same time, banks have recently begun to focus wholeheartedly on the customer experience of their clients, seeking to improve and coordinate the various interactions that consumers have across multiple and diverse touchpoints.

The convergence of these two trends is PFE, defined as A coordinated set of customer interactions that pushes and provides customers relevant, timely information and advice to enable them to live more informed and proactive financial lives. PFE gives customers the ability to access whatever level of financial detail they want, but focuses primarily on context and appropriate accessibility.

A variety of companies – both banks building their own, and vendors focused on developing white-labeled software – have created a wide range of PFM approaches. Most have historically required a fair degree of intentionality on the user’s part, and treat PFM as a discrete activity – a separate tab or a standalone app, for example. PFE changes that. Users will experience PFE without ever having to call it up; it will just happen to them via an alert on their mobile, an idea from a branch representative, or an unexpected landing page on their laptop. The “E” stands for Experiences, plural. PFE isn’t just one touchpoint; it encompasses the wide variety of interactions that a consumer has with her financial institution. Today’s Digital banking will, in fact, become PFE. When banks move to the end-state of PFE, customers will no longer have to choose to manage their financial lives (or by not choosing, default to unmanaged ad-hocracy); instead, financial management will happen in the background, facilitated and orchestrated by the bank, as part of the overall relationship.

Three key principles provide the foundation of a robust set of Personal Financial Experiences.
1 Automatic: Users don’t have to put much conscious thought or effort into entering the data or even asking for guidance. The system gathers that information and proactively provides nuggets of advice and discrete, concrete calls to action.
2 Intuitive: There is no learning curve. Just as kids can start using a new mobile phone out of the box without reading any sort of manual, PFE will be intuitive and user-friendly. PFE becomes normal digital banking.
3 Relevant: PFE will deliver only the information needed at the appropriate time. No longer will a user be confronted with a huge dashboard of charts and dials confusingly presented. Relevance and contextuality will rule.

The iPod wasn’t the first MP3 player; it built on and refined pioneering work done by others. So, too, is PFM the first step in the journey to PFE; we’re not there yet, but we’re well on our way, helped by advances in technology and the incremental changes that FI tinkerers continue to make. We’ll be exploring this concept in greater depth over at celent.com; please check back in, or reply to this post, if you’d like to learn more.

Banking Third Party Risk Management Requirements are a Big and Expensive Ask

Banking Third Party Risk Management Requirements are a Big and Expensive Ask

Celent, through its work with Oliver Wyman, estimates the cost to US financial institutions of undertaking due diligence and assessment of new third party engagements to be ~ $750 million per year. Institutions are paying three times as much as their third party to complete on this exercise. The average cost to an institution to carry out due diligence and an assessment of a new critical third party engagement is $15,000 and takes the institution approximately 16 weeks to complete.

The top ten US banks average between 20,000 and 50,000 third party relationships. Of course, not all of these relationships are active or need extensive monitoring. But the slew of banking regulatory requirements for third party risk management is proving to be complex, all-consuming and expensive for both institutions and the third parties involved. In a nutshell, institutions are liable for risk events of their third and extended parties and ecosystems. The FDIC expresses best the sentiment of worldwide regulators:

“A bank’s use of third parties does not relinquish responsibility… but holds it to the same extent as if the activity were handled within the institution." www.fdic.gov

If an institution doesn’t tighten its third party risk management, it is significantly increasing the odds of a third party data breach or other risk event and will suffer the reputational and financial fallout.

In the first report of a two-part series, just published by Celent, “A Banker’s guide to Third Party Risk Management: Part One Strategic, Complex and Liable”, I show how institutions can take advantage of their established risk management practices such as the Three Lines of Defense governance model, and operational risk management processes to identify, monitor and manage the lifecycle of critical and high-risk third party engagements across functions and levels. It describes the components required for a best-practice program and shows examples of two strong operating risk models being used by the industry that incorporates third party risk management into the enterprisewide risk management program.

Unfortunately, there are few institutions that have successfully implemented strategic third party risk management programs. Most institutions fall between stage 1 and 2 of the four stages of Celent’s Third Party Risk Management Maturity Curve. But continuing to operate without a strategic third party risk management practice will leave your institution in the hands of cyber fate and the regulators.

Chat Bots: Savior or Disintermediator?

Chat Bots: Savior or Disintermediator?

AI is becoming increasingly interesting to bankers.  Last year I wrote a blog about “Assistant as an App”, looking at how concierge apps like MaiKai and Penny are offering up AI-driven financial management services.  My colleague Dan Latimore also recently posted a blog on  AI and its impact.

The emergence of chat bots within popular messaging apps like Facebook Messenger, Slack, Kik, and WeChat similarly has the potential to shift how customers interact with financial institutions. Chat bots offer incredible scale at a pretty cheap price, making adoption potentially explosive. Facebook messenger, for example, has almost one billion active users per month. WhatsApp (soon to launch chat bots) has about the same.  These apps offer some extremely high engagement, and with app downloads decreasing, users are spending more time on fewer apps. According to Tech Crunch, 80% of the time spent on a mobile device is typically split between 3 to 5 apps

Chat bots give the bank the ability to automatically appear in almost all of the most used apps in the world.  The opportunity with digital assistants is immense, and given the nature of bank transactions, it’s not hard to imagine chat bots becoming a widely used engagement method.  Most of banking is heavily rules-based, so the processes are often standard.  Frequent banking requests are pretty straightforward (e.g. ‘send this person X amount of money’ or ‘transfer x amount from savings to checking’).  Bank-owned chat bots are also more built for purpose than some of the multi-purpose third-party products on the market, making the functional scope targetted. While chat bots are still very early days, it won't be long before these kinds of interactions are accessible and the norm. Bank of America already has one; many others have plans or pilots.

This video (skip to 7:30) shows what an advanced chat bot might be able to accomplish. The image below from the Chat Bot Magazine is another conceptual banking use case.  The possibilities are compelling. 

 

 

 

 

But while the opportunity with digital assistants is enormous, banks must be aware of how this affects their current ongoing digital strategy. For example, if chat bots overcome the hype and become a long lasting method for accessing financial services, then what effect will that have on traditional banking apps?  Will chat bots make it foolish to invest large sums of money in dedicated mobile apps? 

For all the promise this technology brings, banks need to be aware that this could be a step towards front-end disintermediation. The threat of tech companies (or other large retailers) stepping in to grab banking licenses and compete directly with incumbents was short lived.  The more realistic scenario was always relegating core banking functions to a utility on the backend of a slickly designed user interface created by a fintech startup.  The incumbents lose the engagement, even if they are facilitating the transactions.

Are chat bots a step towards front-end disintermediation, or are they an extension of the bank’s main app?  If you believe that chat bots are a stepping stone (or companion product) towards a world where the best UI is no UI, and where AI evolves to the point of offering significant functional value, then banks could be at risk.

This isn’t a call to hysteria by any means, nor am I calling chat bots wolves in sheep’s clothing, but banks need to be aware of the potential impact. As voice or message-based interactions become the norm, they will have an effect on a bank’s dedicated mobile app.  In this environment, the mobile app will need to evolve to become something different; non-transactional.

Chatbots will only further fragment the customer journey, requiring an even clearer understanding of how consumers are choosing to handle their finances and make transactions. Banks need to start thinking about how chat bots and AI fit into a long-term digital channels strategy, one that doesn’t handcuff the institution into a no-win proposition of competitive disadvantage versus wilful disruption.

Globalisation: External Forces Driving Corporate Growth and Expansion

Globalisation: External Forces Driving Corporate Growth and Expansion

Treasury management plays an important role in a corporation’s globalisation efforts especially in the areas of cash management, banking, foreign exchange risk, and investments. Treasury must address challenges with managing liquidity distributed across markets, currencies, and businesses, especially the need to keep up with regional liquidity nuances and regulatory issues.

As an outgrowth of globalisation, four key external forces impact opportunities and challenges for corporate growth and expansion: economic uncertainty, geopolitical climate, regulatory environment, and technology evolution.

Eight years on from the 2008–2009 financial crises, global economic growth remains sluggish, hovering between 3.1% and 3.4% since 2012. There are numerous examples of geopolitical events exacerbating volatility, uncertainty, and risks arising from the increasing interconnectedness of regions caused by globalization. New regulations impact treasury organizations in many ways, including in-house banking, intercompany transactions, and transfer pricing documentation.

Corporate treasury organizations continue to lean on technology to facilitate change and mitigate complexity arising from global expansion. Cloud-based treasury management systems (TMS) provide an opportunity to implement specific modules on a subscription pricing basis. Governmental agencies, banks, and fintechs are collaborating to evolve complex corporate treasury services.

As discussed in the new Celent report “Globalisation: External Forces Driving Corporate Growth and Expansion," although firms are in different stages of their globalisation journeys, they can benefit from working with their banking partners to adopt strategies and tactics that address the external factors affecting corporate growth and expansion. Universal banks understand geographic differences and nuances, and are in a unique position to advise firms seeking to expand their businesses globally. This report is the sixth in an ongoing series of reports commissioned by HSBC and written by Celent as part of the HSBC Corporate Insights program.