Sibos 2015: banks reacting to the threat of blockchain and other FinTech

Sibos 2015: banks reacting to the threat of blockchain and other FinTech
Singapore hosted Sibos this year, and judging by the reported 8,000 attendees, transaction banking is alive and well. That also means there were 8,000 different experiences, impressions and takeaways. Here are mine: Banks are fully aware of the threat of posed by technology and are beginning to act on it. Two technology vendors I spoke to said that every single bank they met with asked about blockchain, an extraordinary change from six months ago when it was only beginning to be seriously discussed. It’s encouraging that banks have evolved their positions so quickly. While no one know yet what the killer blockchain uses will be, banks are ramping up experiments along all facets of the value chain. Celent will have more to say about that shortly. Another facet of technology change is the need for banks to partner with FinTech innovators. Based on my conversations with many of these vendors, banks were a lot more willing to discuss new ways of working together. There may even me some movement toward value pricing (that is, mutual sharing in beneficial outcomes), but it’s still very early days; banks seem loathe to give away upside and are unsure how to structure enforceable deals. Sibos’ ambivalence about innovation manifested itself physically with Innotribe. The space was relatively small, and every time I went by I was unable to get in because it was filled to overflowing. Innovation clearly needs to be given even more attention despite the threats it presents to the existing structure. Was this perhaps a physical metaphor of Banking’s relationship with and attitude towards FinTech? Having had four straight nights of canapés for standing dinners, getting home to digest the whirlwind that is Sibos was very welcome. On to Geneva next year!

Increasing headwinds in corporate banking?

Increasing headwinds in corporate banking?

This week I’m in Singapore, which provides a beautiful backdrop for Sibos 2015, the annual conference that brings together thousands of business leaders, decision makers and topic experts from a range of financial institutions, market infrastructures, multinational corporations and technology partners.

IMG_2628

This year’s conference theme is connect, debate and collaborate and takes place at a time of increasing headwinds from a slowing global economy, higher compliance costs, increasingly global corporates, and competition from both banks and nonbanks alike. I spent the past few months taking a deep dive into corporate banking performance over the past 10 years–a period of both tremendous growth and unprecedented upheaval. As expected, corporate banking operating income and customer deposit balances have experienced healthy growth rates over the past 10 years. But surprisingly, despite increases in customer deposits, corporate banking income was largely stagnant over the past few years.

Corporate Banking Income and Deposits

Corporate banking plays a dominant role for the largest global banks. In 2014, corporate banking was responsible for 33% of overall operating income and 38% of customer deposits across the 20 banks included in this analysis.

As outlined in the new Celent report, Corporate Banking: Driving Growth in the Face of Increasing Headwinds, this critical banking sector is shaped by four external forces: economic conditions, the regulatory environment, business demographics, and financial technology. These same factors are slowing corporate banking growth and creating an environment in which banks are overhauling client offerings in the face of regulatory pressure, re-evaluating geographic footprints in response to shifting trade flows, and investing in technologies to ensure a consistent, integrated customer experience.

Much of the discussion at Sibos is on exploring transformation in the face of disruption. As they look to an unsettled future, corporate banks that are flexible, adaptable, and creative will be the ones that succeed. Changing time-tested ways of doing business is painful, but critical for future success.

Helping build the fintech ecosystem in Latin America

Helping build the fintech ecosystem in Latin America
A few weeks ago, Dan Latimore and I had the chance to attend Finnosummit in Mexico City. IMG_1341 While Dan was the one really working (he presented on “How Big Data can change Financial Services”) I mingled around the participants of this vibrant ecosystem encompassing entrepreneurs, financial institutions, investors, and regulators among other stakeholders. It is amazing how the ecosystem continues to grow and how fintech start-ups are booming.IMG_1349         Celent has been collaborating to help create the fintech ecosystem in the Latin American region since its inception and I had the honor, for 2nd time, to judge the fintech start-ups participating in the BBVA Open Talent, which brought the Latin American finalists into town as part of Finnosummit. They had their 5 minutes of glory (or suffering) by pitching their venture to the audience and two winners were selected at the end of the day. Discover the finalists of all regions here. In Latin America two chilean start-ups were the winners: Destacame.cl, aiming to financial inclusion by creating a credit scoring based on utility payments; and Bitnexo which enables fast, easy and low cost transfers between Asia and Latin America, using Bitcoin. In the US & RoW the two winners were: ModernLend enables users with no credit profile to create one in just 6 months by using alternate metrics; and LendingFront which facilitates short term commercial lending through a simple platform. In Europa the winners were Everledger, specialized in anti-fraud technology for financial services and insurance; and Origin an electronic platform that facilitates bond issuing in the capital markets. Many fintech startups that made it to the finals focus on Blockchain technology and payments. These seem to be the areas of major investment for the last two years. If you are interested in these themes I suggest that you follow my colleagues John Dwyer, Zilvinas Bareisis and Gareth Lodge. Coming back to Dan’s presentation, he made a very interesting observation around the need to move from the old paradigm (Customer response optimization) to a new paradigm (Anticipate and shape customer intent) based on the use of big data and analytics, but also warning that disruptors are out there applying the new paradigm today. If you want to get deeper into any of the subjects covered here, please let me know. By the way, is there any fintech start-up you believe has great potential? Share with us please!

Why banks should pay attention to “Assistant as an App”

Why banks should pay attention to “Assistant as an App”
Last week I had the pleasure of going to Finovate, a biannual event (at least in NA) where startups and established vendors show off their newest creations. My colleague Dan Latimore wrote an in-depth piece about it last week. It’s usually a good temperature read of where the market is and what banks are thinking about. PFM used to be hot, now it barely makes an appearance. Mobile account opening and on-boarding was massive. Each year you can count on a few presentations tackling customer communication, whether it´s customer service applications or advisory tools. While this year was no different, I didn´t see any presentations representing an emerging trend in mobile: assistant as an app. What is assistant as an app? Basically, it puts a thin UI between two humans: the customer and the service provider (e.g. retailer or bank). The UI layer enhances the interaction by allowing each party to push information back and forth, whether its text, pictures, data visualization, etc. There are a wide range of possibilities. Apps are already starting to incorporate this idea. For a monthly fee, Pana offerings a human personal travel assistant who will take care of any travel related need. The concierge books restaurants, hotels, rental cars, and flights, all via in-app communication. Pana Vida Health allows users to push dietary information to a health coach that can then send back health plans, ideas to diagnose health issues, or create a weight loss regimen. The dating app Grouper uses a concierge to coordinate group dates. EasilyDo is a personal assistant that can manage your contacts, check traffic, schedule flights, etc. The app Fetch uses SMS to let users ask the concierge to buy just about anything. For a small fee (sometimes free, subsidized by business or premium services) these companies provide value-added premium services to customers through a mobile device. The applicability for banks is obvious. Finances can be complicated; most people aren´t good at managing money, and according to Celent research, consumers still prefer to speak to a human for important money matters. Assistant as an app would offer institutions a clear path towards monetising the mobile channel, moving interactions away from the branch, and capturing a growing base of digitally-directed consumers. I predict this will be a major trend in financial services in the future. What do you think? Feel free to comment below.

Mobile, onboarding among dominant themes at FinovateFall 2015

Mobile, onboarding among dominant themes at FinovateFall 2015
When I’m feeling a bit flip, I tell clients that Celent goes to a lot of conferences so that they don’t have to. Don’t get me wrong: conferences are worthwhile, and you have a lot of serendipitous conversations. But they’re also time away from the office, and, to be honest, not every minute is completely productive. With that in mind, I’ll describe my very-high level takeaways of Finovate Fall 2015, held earlier this week at the New York Hilton. As I listened to each of the 70 7-minute pitches (2 presenters scratched), I tagged them in an unscientific way. Each company received two to eight words describing the space the problem they were solving and how they did it. Here’s the resulting word cloud: Finovate Word Cloud Mobile, unsurprisingly, dominated. I was astonished, however, at the prominence of “onboarding,” a term I used to cover a wide variety of solutions pertaining to account opening, from ID verification to assisted form filling. Many talked about eliminating friction, and creating a platform to support a particular service. Security and Fraud were prominent, as was the concept of components, often enabled by APIs. The biggest surprise: only two companies addressed Blockchain technology – perhaps that will change at FinovateSpring. Somewhere around the 60th presentation, I was struck by the variability in presentation skills and solution excellence. Being a consultant, I had to create a 2×2, below. What did we miss because the product or service was presented sub-optimally? Finally, a big thanks to the folks at Finovate – Celent values our partnership with this great event. If you’d like more detail, check out their blog, which describes the best in show winners. What did you like at Finovate?

Viewing mobile payments strategy holistically

Viewing mobile payments strategy holistically
As the one year anniversary of Apple Pay approaches, banks have to make more decisions about their mobile payments strategy. Android Pay launched in the US a few days ago, and Samsung Pay is expected to be available there soon as well. Should a bank just stick with Apple Pay or enable their cards with all the “pays?” Should they consider alternative options, such as their own HCE-based, or depending on the market, even SIM-based NFC solutions? The answer is that banks have to view their mobile payments strategy holistically. Apple Pay, good as it is, is only available for the latest iOS devices, and only for in-store and in-app payments. Android ecosystem offers more choice: Android Pay, Samsung Pay, HCE and SIM for NFC, but what about P2P and other payments? Barclays in the UK announced this week that it will be launching its own version of mobile payments for Android-based phones. Barclays was a notable absentee when Apple Pay launched in the UK, and are forging ahead with Pingit and bPay wearables. As a result, some view this latest move as yet another indication that the bank “appears to be adopting a go-it-alone strategy with its roll-out of mobile payments, preferring to retain the primary contact with the customer rather than providing the rails for interlopers like Apple, Google and Samsung to hitch a free ride.” I wouldn’t read too much into it. Barclays has since said that it would support Apple Pay at some point in the future. In my view, Barclays is doing what all banks should do – think about mobile payments holistically, i.e. how they will support mobile payments across different platforms and use cases (e.g. in-store, in-app, P2P, etc.). Yes, Android Pay has been launched in the US, but it’s not yet available in the UK. Yet HCE technology has given banks around the world an opportunity to launch their own branded NFC solutions for Android, irrespective of whether Android Pay is available in their market or not. Rather than waiting for Android Pay or Samsung Pay to come to the UK, Barclays is joining the growing list of banks such as BBVA in Spain (read the case study of BBVA Wallet, our Model Bank winner here), RBC in Canada (who were granted a patent for their Secure Cloud payments earlier this month), and others that are taking a proactive stance in developing mobile offerings for their Android user base. I have a new report coming out soon that covers key digital payments issues, such as Android Pay and tokenisation in more detail. Watch this space!

Execution: the Achilles Heel of cool new stuff

Execution: the Achilles Heel of cool new stuff
I’m heading into Finovate in a couple of hours. The UN general assembly is in town, and the only reasonable Starwood hotel I could find was the Aloft in Harlem. It’s amazing that this hotel has exactly the same feel as its counterpart at the Denver Airport…but I digress. I’m writing because Aloft has a cool feature called Keyless Entry. Very simply, I checked in on my SPG app, was given my room (which puzzled the clerk as I tried to check in again – apparently I didn’t even need to stop at the front desk), and my phone was to serve as my key. Brilliant in theory, but in practice I overshot my floor on the elevator because I couldn’t activate the security pad quickly enough, and getting into my room and the health club took several swipes (5-10 seconds) each time. So while I like ditching the plastic key, that convenience is more than outweighed by the hassle of having to call up the app (which takes 5-10 seconds itself to load) and then match it to the pad. I’m using a plastic key next time. Another great idea is using a phone’s camera to capture data, most notably a U.S. driver’s license. I love the demos I’ve seen at prior Finovate events, but when I’ve tried it to open new accounts, it simply didn’t work. Just to show I’m not wholly negative, I also activated my BofA TouchID login today. It worked beautifully, and now I can stop typing in a truly secure password with my thumbs! BofA waited until they got it right (at least for me!). What’s the moral? When rolling something new out, you’d better be sure that it works. Few consumers will give you a second chance, at least not anytime soon, particularly when the alternative is almost as good and the experience is tried and true.