Top trends in corporate banking webinar

Top trends in corporate banking webinar

Please join me on Thursday, April 21st at noon EST for an overview of the 2016 edition of our Top Trends in Corporate Banking report, which was published in March.

2016-04-18_15-40-50

Corporate banks continue to place an enormous focus on investing in digital channels to meet the ever-increasing demands of clients for enhanced tools while boosting security and fraud prevention. Despite this investment, corporate banking has lagged in terms of adoption of innovative technologies. To improve that performance, corporate banking lines of business are undertaking a broad set of initiatives to overcome the inertia that has left clients behind in terms of innovation. Among the top trends, we will examine the opportunities in trade finance and customer onboarding for improving efficiency and enhancing client satisfaction.  Other top trends include fintech partnerships, distributed ledger technology and open APIs and adapting liquidity management strategies.  I look forward to having you join us on Thursday! 

Click here to register

 

 

 

Liquidity management: Staying afloat in turbulent times

Liquidity management: Staying afloat in turbulent times
Liquidity management has recently begun to assume increasing importance as four key external forces create turmoil in a historically placid section of corporate treasury. External Forces

The most significant regulation affecting liquidity management is Basel III, along with others such as money market fund reform. Taken together, they’re changing the way banks structure their balance sheets and the relationship between business customers and their banking partners.

On the economic front, businesses of all sizes continue to seek opportunities abroad. Combined with an environment of negative interest rates in several countries, this is making management of liquidity distributed across markets, currencies, and business units that much more complex and increasingly challenging.

Industry initiatives such as expanded use of ISO 20022 XML and real-time payments provide both opportunities and challenges for cash and liquidity management, and as the speed of transactions accelerates, so does the need for even more timely information.

Technology evolution has facilitated a move toward centralisation, which in turn is accelerating the adoption of more advanced cash and liquidity management capabilities to support the modern day treasury function.

With external forces causing substantive and permanent shifts in available options, corporations need to have the technology infrastructure in place to manage their liquidity and investments with tighter risk governance. As discussed in the new Celent report “Staying Afloat: External Forces Impacting Corporate Liquidity Management,” no one can predict what lies around the next bend in the river, but robust strategic preparation can equip treasurers to ride out the next stretch of liquidity management turmoil.

Increasing headwinds in corporate banking?

Increasing headwinds in corporate banking?

This week I’m in Singapore, which provides a beautiful backdrop for Sibos 2015, the annual conference that brings together thousands of business leaders, decision makers and topic experts from a range of financial institutions, market infrastructures, multinational corporations and technology partners.

IMG_2628

This year’s conference theme is connect, debate and collaborate and takes place at a time of increasing headwinds from a slowing global economy, higher compliance costs, increasingly global corporates, and competition from both banks and nonbanks alike. I spent the past few months taking a deep dive into corporate banking performance over the past 10 years–a period of both tremendous growth and unprecedented upheaval. As expected, corporate banking operating income and customer deposit balances have experienced healthy growth rates over the past 10 years. But surprisingly, despite increases in customer deposits, corporate banking income was largely stagnant over the past few years.

Corporate Banking Income and Deposits

Corporate banking plays a dominant role for the largest global banks. In 2014, corporate banking was responsible for 33% of overall operating income and 38% of customer deposits across the 20 banks included in this analysis.

As outlined in the new Celent report, Corporate Banking: Driving Growth in the Face of Increasing Headwinds, this critical banking sector is shaped by four external forces: economic conditions, the regulatory environment, business demographics, and financial technology. These same factors are slowing corporate banking growth and creating an environment in which banks are overhauling client offerings in the face of regulatory pressure, re-evaluating geographic footprints in response to shifting trade flows, and investing in technologies to ensure a consistent, integrated customer experience.

Much of the discussion at Sibos is on exploring transformation in the face of disruption. As they look to an unsettled future, corporate banks that are flexible, adaptable, and creative will be the ones that succeed. Changing time-tested ways of doing business is painful, but critical for future success.